Agricultural Appropriation Bill, 1922; Hearing Before Subcommittee of House Committee on Appropriations in Charge of the Agricultural Appropriation Bill for 1922. Sixty-Sixth Congress, Third Session

Agricultural Appropriation Bill, 1922; Hearing Before Subcommittee of House Committee on Appropriations in Charge of the Agricultural Appropriation Bill for 1922. Sixty-Sixth Congress, Third Session

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1921 edition. Excerpt: ...and supplies. Mr. Harrison. We are omitting certain language which is permanent legislation. Mr. Cobbs. That language is permanent legislation; we merely omit it. The photographic materials used in this work have advanced very largelv in price. Mr. Anderson. I am told that there is a very marked decrease in the cost of envelopes and paper. Mr. Cobbs. Since when? Mr. Anderson. Within the last six weeks. Mr. Cobbs. I do not think so; I have not seen any. Mr. Jump, did you get some quotations? Mr. Jump. Our last quotations on envelopes do not show any decrease. Take a "4J by 9,"' which is a common size, and of which we use about 300,000 a year. For the fiscal year 1920 the price was $1.29 per thousand. The price this year, under the contract which the Post Office Department negotiates, is $2.14--nearly double. For another size, of which we use over a million, the price last year was $1.72 a thousand, and this year it is $3.15. For another size, of which we are using a million and a half a year, the price last year was $2.30. and this year it is $3.70. and it runs that way right straight along. Mr. Ri'bet. Are these contracts made for the fiscal year? Mr. Jump. Kvery three months the Post Office Department negotiates: i new contract on envelopes for the Government departments, and that will reflect any reduction in the price of the material. We have not heard of any so far. We are going along under these prices. Of course, if there is a slump' in the market when new contracts are made, we will get the benefit of them. With paper, it is largely the same proposition: but we do not buy those things out of this item we are discussing now. This is for photographic materials. TELEPHONE, TELEGRAPH, FREIOUT AND EXPRESS CHARGES. Mr. Cobbs. In item 7....show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 542 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 28mm | 957g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236554582
  • 9781236554581