After-Dinner Stories; Containing a Great Many Stories by the Author, Which Are Absolutely Original, Both in Essence and Construction, and Appearing for the First Time in Print Together with a Select Assortment of the Brightest Gems of

After-Dinner Stories; Containing a Great Many Stories by the Author, Which Are Absolutely Original, Both in Essence and Construction, and Appearing for the First Time in Print Together with a Select Assortment of the Brightest Gems of

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1916 edition. Excerpt: ...be you coom from, -und vot ish your name?" The attorney modestly gave his-name and-said, "I am a member of the New York bar." "Vell, den, you gant bractis in dis gort," replied the justice. "I am a counselor of the Supreme Court of the State of New York," urged the lawyer. "Dot makes nut'ing tifferent," said the obstinate justice. "Well, then," said the baffled lawyer, "suppose I show your honor that I am a counselor of the Supreme Court of the United States." "It doan make a pit better, you ain't a counselor von the State ove New Jersey, und you gant bractis in dis gort!" shouted the justice with an air of finality. This decision accounts for the fact that the State of v New Jersey is not considered one of the United States, j Asked a lawyer of a witness on the stand: "Do you know the prisoner, Mr. Jones?" "Yes, to the bone." "What is his character?" "Didn't know he had any." "Does he live near you?" "So near that he hasn't bought-a chicken in five years." A country justice, thinking he would have some sport at the expense of a quaint old farmer, said to him: "I suppose, Silas, you have a conscience quite as long as your whiskers?" "Wall, yer onner, said the old man dryly, "ef ye measures by whiskers, I reckin ye hain't got no-conshuns yersel'." "Suppose," said the lawyer who was cross-examining a witness in a suit for damages by accident, and who wanted the reluctant witness to-define the words "fortunate accident"--"suppose that a man fell from a tenth-story window.and was unhurt; what would you call that?" "I would call that luck." "Then...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 34 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 82g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236553977
  • 9781236553973