After the Bell

After the Bell : Contemporary American Prose About School

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Description

The sixty-two short essays in "After the Bell" describe in many voices the emotional complexity and historical record of one experience most of us have in common: elementary and secondary school, from our first day all the way to graduation twelve years later. Whether public or private, rural or urban, school is the first place we navigate on our own, learning how we stand apart, how we stand out, and where we do - or don't - fit in. The essays are by emerging as well as established fiction writers, poets, social commentators, and educational theorists. Told from the point of view of students, teachers, parents, and administrators through the multiple perspectives of race, class, physical and intellectual abilities, and sexuality, the stories reveal how memories of our school days haunt and sustain us. As Naomi Shihab Nye notes, "there will never be a last day of school." That's the good news and the bad news about our common experience. From the staunchly Lutheran brick schoolhouse of Garrison Keillor's New Albion Academy in 1948 to Annie Thoms' Manhattan high school at Ground Zero on September 11, 2001, from Alberto Rios' confusion as a bilingual child in a monolingual classroom to Henry Louis Gates' hard lessons in the segregated South, the essays in this funny, poignant, and stimulating collection capture the many public worlds of the school community as well as its idiosyncratic secrets.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 200 pages
  • 139.7 x 220.98 x 12.7mm | 249.47g
  • University of Iowa Press
  • Iowa, United States
  • English
  • Revised
  • 1587296039
  • 9781587296031

About Maggie Anderson

Maggie Anderson is professor of English at Kent State University, where she directs the Wick Poetry Center and the Northeast Ohio Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing Program. She is the author of five books of poetry, including Windfall: New and Selected Poems, and the coeditor of A Gathering of Poets. David Hassler is the program and outreach director for the Wick Poetry Center at Kent State University; he conducts writing workshops throughout northeast Ohio. He is the author of two books of poems, most recently Red Kimono, Yellow Barn, for which he was named the 2006 Ohio Poet of the Year. He is the coeditor of A Place to Grow: Voices and Images of Urban Gardeners and, with photographer Gary Harwood, the author of Growing Season: The Life of a Migrant Community. After the Bell is the prose companion to Anderson and Hassler's poetry anthology Learning by Heart: Contemporary American Poetry about School (IOWA 1999).show more

Review quote

" Our schooling makes us brave or timid, adept socially or not; it makes us team players or selfish players. Children may understand the larger implications of their classes long before they can articulate their feelings. So remember, when you urge your children to hurry lest they miss the bus, you urge them toward a complicated future, much of which is subject to random luck." - Jane Kenyon in "After the Bell" " They said daydreaming was against the law, but some of us escaped, slipping out windows and over cyclone fences, some of us flying away with heads like balloons. We taught our dogs to love the flavor of homework and became expert forgers of our parents' signatures. We knew they were teaching us how to die but some of us said no in our stealthy and stubborn ways." - Vern Rutsala in "After the Bell" "Our schooling makes us brave or timid, adept socially or not; it makes us team players or selfish players. Children may understand the larger implications of their classes long before they can articulate their feelings. So remember, when you urge your children to hurry lest they miss the bus, you urge them toward a complicated future, much of which is subject to random luck." Jane Kenyon in "After the Bell"" "They said daydreaming was against the law, but some of us escaped, slipping out windows and over cyclone fences, some of us flying away with heads like balloons. We taught our dogs to love the flavor of homework and became expert forgers of our parents signatures. We knew they were teaching us how to die but some of us said no in our stealthy and stubborn ways." Vern Rutsala in "After the Bell""show more

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