Affidavit of Sir F. Burdett Read in the Court of King's Bench February 8, 1821, Before Lord Chief-Justice Abbott, and the Justices Bayley, Holroyd and Best, Previous to Their Passing a Sentence for Words Contained in the Admirable

Affidavit of Sir F. Burdett Read in the Court of King's Bench February 8, 1821, Before Lord Chief-Justice Abbott, and the Justices Bayley, Holroyd and Best, Previous to Their Passing a Sentence for Words Contained in the Admirable

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1821 edition. Excerpt: ...has been withdrawn, of being considered fully absolved of the crimes which were alleged against her. But this right is now denied her: when no adjudication had been come to upon the bill, it is attempted to visit her with its severest penalties, in the same manner as if she had really been found guilty, and the bill had passed to final adjudication. Thus is she deprived of the advantages of this mode of proceeding which had been vainly promised to her, and especially of this important one--important not only to her Majesty, but to every one who hears me--that a person discharged from all accusation should no longer be considered as guilty (loud applause). When such attempts are making to pervert the result of the proceedings against her, and when further proceedings are meditated, will you sanction such a mockery of justice, and consent that the severest enactments of the odious Bill of Pains and Penalties should still be inflicted on her Majesty? It is true, that the bill not having passed into a law, she cannot be denuded of her state and title of Queen; but if she be still deprived of the rights and privileges attached to her station--if her name be still excluded from the Liturgy, that act of original injury and insult--if a royal residence be still denied her--if sine be still dependent on Ministers for that support, which she ought to have derived from the liberality of Parliament--if, though the bill have failed, she be still exposed to all these insults and acts of injustice--if, in short, as Mr. Orde says, she be still to be considered and treated as guilty, --what is it, I would ask, but a mockery of all justice (applause)? But this injustice no Briton will ever bear; and I perfectly agree with my friend, Mr. Bigge, that the feeling in..show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 26 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 1mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236656407
  • 9781236656407