The Aeneid

The Aeneid

3.8 (82,550 ratings by Goodreads)
By (author)  , Translated by  , Introduction by 

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Description

The supreme Roman epic and the greatest poem in Latin, the Aeneid has inspired many of the great European poets including Dante and Milton. The Trojan hero Aeneas, after surviving the sack of Troy, makes his way to the West, urged on by benevolent deities and following a destiny laid down by Jupiter, but harassed and impeded by the goddess Juno. He wins his way to Italy despite many trials, of which the greatest is the tragic outcome of his love affair with Dido, Queen of Carthage. In Italy Aeneas visits the world of the dead, and is forced to wage a fearful war with the indigenous Italian tribes before he can found his city and open the history of Rome. The Aeneid survives as a poem not only of Roman imperialism but also of the whole world of human passion, duty and suffering.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 480 pages
  • 128 x 196 x 32mm | 381.02g
  • Oxford University Press
  • Oxford Paperbacks
  • Oxford, United Kingdom
  • Latin
  • New edition
  • New edition
  • 019283584X
  • 9780192835840
  • 934,982

Review Text

After giving us perhaps the finest modern versions of Homer (rivaled only by Lattimore), Fitzgerald has now translated a spirited, eloquent, fresh Aeneid - though some will still prefer Allan Mandelbaum's. Fitzgerald has had his eye on Virgil for many years - he edited Dryden's Aeneid, with notes and an expert Introduction, in 1964 - but his own poetic voice is decidedly un-Virgilian: brisk, bold, hearty, a sociable baritone. His irregular pentameters, with continual enjambment, come in great fluid rushes (less "faithful" but more readable than Mandelbaum's slower-paced lines), often making a spring tide of a quiet Virgilian stream. Virgil's discreet rhetorical emphasis sometimes becomes startlingly colloquial: e.g., "Fortune has made a derelict/ Of Sinon, but the bitch/Won't make an empty liar of him, too." And even when Fitzgerald tries to echo the original, he can't help sounding more direct and homespun. Lively rather than exquisite, vigorous and risky, with only a few outright anachronistic clinkers: the most accessible Aeneid (since Dryden, anyway) for a Latin-less modern audience, especially helpful in sustaining readers through the often-wearisome battle scenes in the later books. (Kirkus Reviews)show more

Rating details

82,550 ratings
3.8 out of 5 stars
5 29% (23,786)
4 34% (27,941)
3 28% (23,074)
2 8% (6,261)
1 2% (1,488)
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