Advances in Organizational Justice

Advances in Organizational Justice

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This is a state-of-the-science book about organizational justice, which is the study of people's perception of fairness in organizations. The volume's contributors, all acknowledged leaders in this burgeoning field, present new theoretical positions, clarify existing paradigms, and identify future areas of application. The first chapter provides a comprehensive framework that integrates and synthesizes key concepts in the field: distributive justice, procedural justice, and retributive justice. The second chapter is a full theoretical analysis of how people use fairness judgments as means of guiding their reactions to organizations and their authorities. The subsequent two chapters examine the conceptual interrelationships between various forms of organizational justice. First, we are given a definitive review and analysis of interactional justice that critically assesses the evidence bearing on its validity. The next chapter argues that previous research has underemphasized important similarities between distributive and procedural justice, and suggests new research directions for establishing these similarities. The three following chapters focus on the social and interpersonal antecedents of justice judgments: the influence that expectations of justice and injustice can have on work-related attitudes and behavior; the construction of a model of the determinants and consequences of normative beliefs about justice in organizations that emphasizes the role of cross-cultural norms; and the potential impact of diversity and multiculturalism on the viability of organizations. The book's final chapter identifies seven canons of organizational justice and warns that in the absence of additional conceptual refinement these canons may operate as loose cannons that threaten the existence of justice as a viable construct in the organizational sciences.show more

Product details

  • Hardback | 304 pages
  • 157.5 x 231.1 x 27.9mm | 567g
  • Stanford University Press
  • Palo Alto, United States
  • English
  • New.
  • 0804741328
  • 9780804741323

Back cover copy

"This book brings together the world's leading scholars in the field of justice and fairness. Rather than just summarizing existing research, this sparkling collection also offers the latest thinking about new and productive directions for future research. It is a 'must have' for any scholar or student working on the problems of justice."--Roderick M. Kramer, Stanford Universityshow more

Review quote

"This book brings together the world's leading scholars in the field of justice and fairness. Rather than just summarizing existing research, this sparkling collection also offers the latest thinking about new and productive directions for future research. It is a `must have' for any scholar or student working on the problems of justice."-Roderick M. Kramer, Stanford Universityshow more

About Jerald Greenberg

Jerald Greenberg is Abramowitz Professor of Business Ethics at The Ohio State University. His most recent publication is the seventh edition of Behavior in Organizations. Russell Cropanzano is Associate Professor and Industrial/Organizational Section Coordinator in the Department of Psychology at Colorado State University.show more

Flap copy

This is a state-of-the-science book about organizational justice, which is the study of people's perception of fairness in organizations. The volume's contributors, all acknowledged leaders in this burgeoning field, present new theoretical positions, clarify existing paradigms, and identify future areas of application. The first chapter provides a comprehensive framework that integrates and synthesizes key concepts in the field: distributive justice, procedural justice, and retributive justice. The second chapter is a full theoretical analysis of how people use fairness judgments as means of guiding their reactions to organizations and their authorities. The subsequent two chapters examine the conceptual interrelationships between various forms of organizational justice. First, we are given a definitive review and analysis of interactional justice that critically assesses the evidence bearing on its validity. The next chapter argues that previous research has underemphasized important similarities between distributive and procedural justice, and suggests new research directions for establishing these similarities. The three following chapters focus on the social and interpersonal antecedents of justice judgments: the influence that expectations of justice and injustice can have on work-related attitudes and behavior; the construction of a model of the determinants and consequences of normative beliefs about justice in organizations that emphasizes the role of cross-cultural norms; and the potential impact of diversity and multiculturalism on the viability of organizations. The book's final chapter identifies seven canons of organizational justice and warns that in the absence of additional conceptual refinement these canons may operate as loose cannons that threaten the existence of justice as a viable construct in the organizational sciences.show more

Table of contents

Preface List of figures and tables 1. Fairness theory: justice as accountability Robert Folger and Russell Cropanzano 2. Fairness heuristic theory: justice judgments as pivotal cognitions in organizational relations E. Allan Lind 3. Interactional (in)justice: the sacred and the profane Robert J. Bies 4. Procedurl and distributive justice are more similar than you think: a monistic perspective and a research agenda Russell Cropanzano and Maureen L. Ambrose 5. Anticipatory injustice: the consequences of expecting injustice in the workplace Debra L. Shapiro and Bradley L. Kirkman 6. When do elements of procedural fairness make a difference? a classification to moderating differences Joel Brockner, Grant Ackerman and Gregory Fairchild 7. Ethnic diversity and the viability of organizations: the role of procedural justice in bridging differences Yuen J. Huo and Tom R. Tyler 8. The seven loose can(n)ons of the organizational justice Jerald Greenberg Index.show more

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