The Action of Medicines in the System, Or, on the Mode in Which Therapeutic Agents Introduced Into the Stomache Produce Their Peculiar Effects on the Animal Economy; Being the Prize Essay to Which the Medical Society of London Awarded the

The Action of Medicines in the System, Or, on the Mode in Which Therapeutic Agents Introduced Into the Stomache Produce Their Peculiar Effects on the Animal Economy; Being the Prize Essay to Which the Medical Society of London Awarded the

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1863 edition. Excerpt: ...And some such substance as the decomposing Caseine in sour milk, which is capable of effecting this change out of the body, would be most likely to avail us, if we could contrive to introduce it into the blood. In an Essay on the Nature and Treatment of Diabetes, read before the Medical Society of London, I ventured to recommend that fresh milk should be freely consumed as an article of diet in this disorder--as it does not seem to be proved that its milk-sugar is liable to conversion into Glucose, or excretion in the urine--and, at the same time, that milk just turned sour should be administered in smaller quantities as a therapeutic agent. This recommendation has since been adopted with much success in several cases. Yeast has been given as a ferment likely to forward the development of grape-sugar. But there are two important objections to it. It tends to transform the sugar into Alcohol, instead of Lactic acid; and it operates only in the stomach, whereas it is in the blood that we desire the action of a ferment. Rennet has been recommended with more plausibility. It has been tried and found beneficial by Dr. Gray of Glasgow. Being a material of rather variable nature, it is uncertain in its remedial action. Further, Berzelius and Mialhe have thrown grave doubts on the facts assumed by Liebig, that Rcnnet e. Pepsine) coagulates milk by producing lacticpacid. Milk is more probably turned sour by some decomposing Caseine in the milk itself. On which ground I have recommended sour milk as a remedy in Diabetes. '' Boudrimont produced symptoms of intoxication by administering Beer yeast to a diabetic chi1d.--(Journ. de Chimie Med. Mar. 1856.) In decided opposition to such recommendations, and on a principle which I believe to be...
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Product details

  • Paperback | 152 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 286g
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236776879
  • 9781236776877