Across the Plains and Over the Divide; A Mule Train Journey from East to West in 1862, and Incidents Connected Therewith, with Map and Illustrations

Across the Plains and Over the Divide; A Mule Train Journey from East to West in 1862, and Incidents Connected Therewith, with Map and Illustrations

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1906 edition. Excerpt: ... for their peaks to pierce the clouds, and be above the snow line. VVe moved slowly to-day, so as to keep near accompanying trains. It was necessary to climb a long way up the side of one of these mountains for a supply of wood for cooking the evening meal. Across the creek, in a conspicuous place, were the graves of the four men, spoken of previously, who had been murdered by Indians. The bodies were discovered and recognized by friends a few days afterwards, and given proper interment, the last tribute of friend to friend in this dismal region. The red fiends, not to leave their bloody work half done, had scalped and frightfully mutilated the bodies of their victims and then made off with their plunder. We visited the scene of the conflict, which bore evidence of a severe struggle and a hard contested field; it is ever difficult to tell what damage has been inflicted on an unseen Indian foe, as they always carry away their dead and wounded, if there are any. This was the work of Indian "braves." There were persistent, and what were deemed well anthenticated stories that Mormons were largely mixed up in these Indian forays; that they incited much of the murderous action and would lend assistance, where needed, and that most of the articles obtained by robbing and murdering emigrants, other than guns, ammunition and knives, found their way to Salt Lake City, and a ready market. No doubt our party had been watched and trailed along the way by Indians and their white allies, as signal fires in the mountains indicated; but an appearance of strength was a sure protection. The Danites and the John D. Lees were known of all frontiersmen and defenseless emigrants, and their bloody deeds struck terror to the hearts of all. The...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 126 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 240g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236746341
  • 9781236746344