Acetylene Gas, Its Nature, Properties and Uses; Also Calcium Carbide, Its Composition, Properties and Method of Manufacture

Acetylene Gas, Its Nature, Properties and Uses; Also Calcium Carbide, Its Composition, Properties and Method of Manufacture

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1898 edition. Excerpt: ...illuminants, taking ordinary coal gas as the standard of comparison, is as follows: Comparative cost of lighting by various means for an equal degree of illumination. Coal gas (ordinary burner) at 2/9 per 1,000 cu. ft. l-00 Do. (Welsbach Incandescent).........-47 Petroleum...............-62 Acetylene (Carbide at 20 per ton)......-85 Electricity, at 4d. per B.T.U 1-68 In the estimate of the cost in the Welsbach system the amount is for gas only; if interest upon cost of special fittings and renewal of mantles be included, the comparative cost would probably be nearer-75. Acetylene therefore compares very favourably with coal gas, whether under ordinary or the more favourable incandescent conditions, whereas it is only about half the cost of electricity at the low rate of 4d. per B.T.U. The relative photometric value or light-power of an illuminant is determined either by comparison with the standard candle or with another illuminant of similar nature and of known power. The British standard is the sperm candle and is the amount of light emitted by such medium when consumed at the rate of about 120 grains per hour. The apparatus usually employed for computing the illuminating value of artificial light is known as the Photometer, and consists of a disc of white paper having a "grease spot" in the centre. It was the invention of the eminent Runsen, and although it has been varied in form and construction, in principle it remains the same. When the degree of illumination on each side of the disc is equal the whole of the light is reflected therefrom and the grease spot apparently disappears, but when the illumination is unequal, the spot at once becomes visible, more particularly on the side facing the stronger light, owing to...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 24 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 1mm | 64g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236840550
  • 9781236840554