Account of the Valley of Munnipore and of the Hill Tribes with a Comparative Vocabulary of the Munnipore and Other Languages

Account of the Valley of Munnipore and of the Hill Tribes with a Comparative Vocabulary of the Munnipore and Other Languages

By (author) 

List price: US$15.84

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1859 edition. Excerpt: ... passing through one village and close to several others. And as the traveller from the West would first come upon this people, an account of the tribes may be properly commenced with one of them. The Koupooees occupy the hills between Cachar and the Valley of Munnipore in their whole breadth, a direct distance of about forty miles; and from 25 North lattitude, they formerly extended over nearly an equal distance to the South. The whole of-this tract was formerly thickly studded with villages, some of them of considerable size, but in consequence of the attacks of enemies, and the oppression of Munnipore since their subjugation, many villages of the present time are entirely deserted, and the majority of the remainder are much reduced in size. Songboo tradition gives, as the place of their origin, thd mountain towards the South of the Valley named Thungching. They state themselves to be, at present, located on the sites of villages at one time occupied by the southern tribes who are, they say, the elder branch of the family of which they themselves are the middle, and the Munniporees, the younger branch. They and all the other races of hill people congregate in communities, composed usually of families connected with one anothor by blood-ties. The' superior elevations being the most healthy, their villages are usually to be found in them. Each house is constructed with reference to its own convenience, the regularity of the village is not cared for, but no house is s.o far removed from the rest, as to preclude its being included in the stockade or rampart of stones which usually surrounds them as a defence either from their enemies or wild beasts. Before the subjugation of the Songboos to Munnipore, almost every village was at war...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 36 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 82g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236828267
  • 9781236828262