An Account of the United Hospitals' Club from Its Foundation, Feb. 14th, 1828, to Its Diamond Jubilee, Feb. 13th, 1903, Being the 301st Dinner of the Club

An Account of the United Hospitals' Club from Its Foundation, Feb. 14th, 1828, to Its Diamond Jubilee, Feb. 13th, 1903, Being the 301st Dinner of the Club

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1904 edition. Excerpt: ..."be considered eligible for election into the Club." Many felt evidently with the proposer, for the ballot shewed twelve ayes and four noes; but the motion was lost since two black balls exclude. However, on 2nd February, i860, Dr. Babington succeeded in carrying the same proposition through, the qualifications for candidature beingt "medical men who hold offices as Physicians or "Surgeons or Medical teachers at either Hospital." The ballot was not, however, unanimous, and had not a previous motion been passed that on this occasion the "majority to decide," the proposition would have been lost as its predecessor, the balls registering twelve ayes and five noes. It is on this new rule that the Club has since had eminent members who only have belonged to the " Boro' Hospitals" by adoption: for example. Sir William MacCormac and Liebreich. Dr. Braxton Hicks, on February 7th, 1889, proposed that the word "profession"--regarded as qualifying for membership--should include "Law, "Divinity, Arms, Scientific." The proposal was discussed at the next meeting in May, but the general expression of opinion was so adverse to it that the motion was never actually voted upon; nor is the Club at the present time at all inclined to quarrel with the view then taken. There is but one instance where a gentleman who, though a member of the profession, yet neither a teacher at either hospital nor in active practice, was admitted a member of the Club; and he was Mr. Nathaniel Montefiori, F.R.C.S. (1858), who was elected on the motion of Mr. Arthur Durham (May 6th, 1875), seconded by Mr. E. Kingsford on 6th November, 1879. No one has ever been found to take exception to this admitted straining of the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 26 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 1mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236575490
  • 9781236575494