An Account of the Musical Performances in Westminster-Abbey, and the Pantheon, May 26th, 27th, 29th, and June the 3D and 5th, 1784; In Commemoration of Handel

An Account of the Musical Performances in Westminster-Abbey, and the Pantheon, May 26th, 27th, 29th, and June the 3D and 5th, 1784; In Commemoration of Handel

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1785 edition. Excerpt: ...seemingly ascending into the clouds, in each of the side aisles, as their termination was was invisible to the audience. The principal singers were ranged in the front of the Orchestra, as at Oratorios, accompanied by the choirs of St. Paul, the Abbey, Windsor, and the ChapelRoyal. The design of appointing Subdiredlors, was to diminish, as much as possible, the trouble of the noblemen and gentlemen who had projected the undertaking, as well as that of the Conductor: and this was effected with great diligence and zeal, not only in superintending the business at the doors of admission, and conducting the company to their seats, which fell to the share of Dr. Cook, Dr. Ayrton, and messieurs Jones, Aylward, and Parsons, all professors of the first class; but in arranging the performers, and conveying signals to the several parts of that wide-extended Orchestra: departments which fell to the lot of Dr. Arnold and Mr. Dupuis, organists and composers to his Majesty, and Mr. Redmond Simpson, eminent and respectable professors, of great experience, who may be said to have acted as Adjutant-Generals on the occasion j Dr. Arnold and Mr. Depuis having been placed, on different sides of the Orchestra, over the vocal choir, and Mr. Simpson in the centre, over the subordinate instrumental performers. In selecting these delegates among the members of the Musical Society, great care was taken not to enfeeble the Orchestra, by employing such performers as were likely to augment its force; but such as had either ceased to play in public, or whose instruments being the organ and harpsichord, of which only one was wanted, accepted of parts which were not the less useful for beihg Jilently performed. Of the care and intelligence with which preparations were...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 60 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 127g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236917979
  • 9781236917973