An Account of Methodism in Rossendale and the Neighbourhood, with Some Notices of the Rise and Progress of the United Societies

An Account of Methodism in Rossendale and the Neighbourhood, with Some Notices of the Rise and Progress of the United Societies

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1880 edition. Excerpt: ...of people being in attendance, mourning that the Society had lost one of her brightest examples. His widow continued for some years after her husband's decease, and in 1816 departed in peace. Mr. Maden's descendants followed in his steps, and some continue to the fourth generation to maintain the principles of their honoured ancestor; one of them, Henry Maden, Esq., of Rockliffe House, having become one of Her Majesty's Justices, of the Peace. John Maden had for many years made his house the preacher's home, a pilgrim's inn where all who were earnestly engaged in the work of the church had found a cordial welcome for half a century past. It must have been refreshing to him to see that, as his strength declined, Divine Providence was raising up others to carry on the work with still increasing efficiency. Two other names come prominently into view long before this devoted pioneer had begun to decline. John Earnshaw and James Dawson were standing ready to take the places of such as were stricken down, and to carry on the strife against ignorance and sin. The Earnshaws were natives of the valley. John Earnshaw was a member of the first class-meeting which was permanently established in Rossendale, after that which had only a temporary existence had been scattered by antinomian zealots, leaving John Maden the only representative of Methodism in the dale. Mr. E. was a small manufacturer. He began business at Broadclough, at th' Owler's Meadow's Mill; and when the second chapel was built in Bacup, and the old one turned into cottages, he occupied them for working some of his spinning jennies. There were four John Earnshaws in four succeeding generations; and in a region where nicknames sprang thick as heather on the mountains, and were as difficult to...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 134 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 254g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236509765
  • 9781236509765