Accident Bulletin; Summary and Analysis of Accidents on Railroads in the United States Subject to the Interstate Commerce ACT Volume 1-42

Accident Bulletin; Summary and Analysis of Accidents on Railroads in the United States Subject to the Interstate Commerce ACT Volume 1-42

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1902 edition. Excerpt: ... the side track being used in common by the two roads as a connecting track. Derailment No. 1, killing 19 persons and injuring 149, is reported as "cause unknown," the railroad company stating that its investigation into the circumstances of the accident has not yet been completed. The train derailed consisted of five passenger cars, drawn by two electric motors. It was running at full speed on a curve of 3, the outer rail of which was superelevated 4i inches. Two cars were overturned. The track consisted of rails weighing 100 pounds to the yard, laid on 21 ties to each 33 feet, with tie plates. The ballast was stone and the whole track was well built and maintained. In the cab of the leading motor were four men, the engineman, his helper, an electrical inspector, and the assistant superintendent of the division. These men estimate the speed of the train at the time of the derailment at 45 to 50 miles an hour, which estimate is corroborated by the record at the last block signal station, compared with that at the power house, where note of the time was made when power was automatically shut off by the breaking of the thirdrail electrical conductor at the moment when the cars jumped the track. The report of the railroad company further says that in making a test'run some time after the accident, with a train made up like that which was wrecked and with all conditions similar, the speed proved to be 48 miles an hour at the point of the accident. A careful examination was made of the track and wreckage immediately after the derailment, but although indentations were found on wheels and rails, it was impossible to determine whether these marks had anything to do with the cause of the derailment, or were only effects. Derailment No. 18...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 158 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 9mm | 295g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236604288
  • 9781236604286