The Absorption Spectra of Solutions as Affected by Temperature and by Dilution; A Quantitative Study of Absorption Spectra by Means of the Radiomicrometer

The Absorption Spectra of Solutions as Affected by Temperature and by Dilution; A Quantitative Study of Absorption Spectra by Means of the Radiomicrometer

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1913 edition. Excerpt: ...minima appear at X572, X730, X786, and X860. Bands X730, X786, and X860 do not appear on the photographic plate, and the last two seem never to have been detected before. The above wave-lengths are given as in the tables. The salts of neodymium were studied as far as X20000, but beyond 1// there seems to be complete transparency. The absorption of water is, as is well known, very great in the region X12000 to X20000. DISCUSSION OF THE RESULTS. The results are plotted in figs. 1 to 11. The abscissae are percentage transparencies, the ordinates are wave-lengths. These curves, since they represent the transparencies of the solutions in question, are called transmission curves. Figs. 1, 2, and 3 represent the transparency of solutions of neodymium chloride expressed in terms of Beer's law. If we represent the concentration by N and the depth of layer by d, Nd= constant The concentration represented in fig. I1 is 3.43 normal, in lig. 2 it is 0.857 normal, and in fig. 3 it is 0.427 normal. The depth of layer represented by fig. 1 is 2.5 mm., by fig. 2 it is 10 mm., and by fig. 3 it is 20 mm. The concentration and depth of layer were thus varied so as to keep Nd constant. If the solvent plays no rdle in the absorption, the three sets of curves must fall directly over one another, i. e., be identical, since the number of absorbing parts in the path of the beam of light is kept constant. A comparison of the curves shows that, in general, the more concentrated the solution the less the transparency and the broader the absorption bands. In the more dilute solution the intensity of the bands is greater. This comes out very clearly in the red and infra-red region, where there is greater accuracy of measurement. Take the three absorption bands, X730, X785, and...show more

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  • Paperback | 34 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 82g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236635787
  • 9781236635785