Abridgement of Murray's English Grammar; With an Appendix, Containing Exercises in Orthography, in Parsing, in Syntax, and in Punctuation. Designed for the Younger Classes of Learners. to Which Questions Are Added--Punctuation, and the

Abridgement of Murray's English Grammar; With an Appendix, Containing Exercises in Orthography, in Parsing, in Syntax, and in Punctuation. Designed for the Younger Classes of Learners. to Which Questions Are Added--Punctuation, and the

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1836 edition. Excerpt: ...him do it;" "Ye dare not do it;" "J saw him do it;' "I heard him say it;" "Thou lettest him go." Note 1. The particle to, the sign of the infinitive mood, is sometimes improperly used; as, "J have observed some satirists to use," &c.; "To see so many to make so little conscience of so great a sin;" "I am not like other men, to envy the talents I cannot reach." RULE XIII. fn the use of words and phrases which, in point of time, relate to each other, a due regard to that relation should be observed. Instead of saying "The Lord hath given, and the Lord hath taken away we should say, "The Lord gave, and the I n philosophical strictness, both number and person might be entirely excluded from every verb. They are, in fact, the properties of substantives, not a part of the essence of a verb. Even the name of the imperative mood, does not always correspond to its nature; for it pome times petition! as well as commands. But, with respect to nil these points, the practice of our grammarians is so uniformly fixed, and so analogous to the languages, ancient and modern, which our youth have to study, that it would be an un warrantable degree of innovation, to deviate from the established terms and arrangements.--See Imperative Mood, p. 31. Lord hoik taken away." Instead of, "I remember the family more than twenty years;V it should be, a 1 have remembered the family more than twenty years." Obs. Whatever period the governing verb assumes, whether present, past, or future, ihe governed verb in the infinitive always respects that period, and its time is calculated from it. Note 1. All verbs expressive of hope, desire, intention, or command, must invariably be...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 40 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 91g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236645758
  • 9781236645753