An Abridged Translation of M. Ramond's Instructions for the Application of the Barometer to the Measurement of Heights, by B. Powell. [Followed By] Appendix, by B. Powell

An Abridged Translation of M. Ramond's Instructions for the Application of the Barometer to the Measurement of Heights, by B. Powell. [Followed By] Appendix, by B. Powell

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1823 edition. Excerpt: ... on the ratio of the pressure of the air to its weight; a ratio which offers one of the newest questions in meteorology, and one which is the most fruitful in important consequences. An attention to the foregoing considerations in conducting a series of meteorological observations will be accompanied ly the following advantages. L The mean height of the barometer at noon, at the same time that it has the property of expressing the mean pressure of the atmosphere, disengaged from the diurnal variation, possesses also exclusively among all other means, the qualities required for the determination of differences of elevation. The coefficient of a barometric formula can never be exact but in reference to a fixed hour. Now the coefficient of M. de Laplace's formula is appropriated precisely to the hour of noon: it is a truly fortunate coincidence that we thus are enabled to determine the elevation of places, by the use of the same barometric means which have served to determine the respective pressures. 2. The morning, afternoon, and evening observations made at the critical hours of the daily variation, after having been of daily utility for foreseeing changes of weather, have besides the advantage of fixing, for each climate, the extent and circumstances of the variation: and each series separately reduced to its mean expression, being employed in the calculation of differences of level, instead of the mean of noon, will give the measure of the error arising from the hour; and consequently the correction which the coefficient requires in order to become applicable to that hour. I will conclude with one consideration of which we must never lose sight. Barometric means cannot be employed to determine the elevation of distant places above one...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 26 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 1mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236856368
  • 9781236856364