AIDS to Reflection, and the Confessions of an Inquiring Spirit. to Which Are Added His Essays on Faith and the Book of Common Prayer

AIDS to Reflection, and the Confessions of an Inquiring Spirit. to Which Are Added His Essays on Faith and the Book of Common Prayer

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1884 edition. Excerpt: ...personages among the actors and interlocutors of, the parable. In the temple-language of Egypt the serpent was the symbol of the understanding in its twofold function, namely as the faculty of means to proximate or medial, ends, analogous to the instinct of the more intelligent animals, ant, bee, beaver, and the like, and opposed to the practical reason, as the determinant of the ultimate end; and again, it typifies the understanding as the discursive and logical faculty possessed individually by each individual--the Xoyoc Iv Udario, in distinction from the vovg, that is, intuitive reason, the source of ideas and Absolute Truths, and the principle of the necessary and the universal in our affirmations and conclusions. Without or in contra-vention to the reason (f. e. the spiritual mind of St. Paul, and the light that lightelh every man of St. John) this understanding (Qpovniia oapKbc., or carnal mind) becomes the sophistic principle, the wily tempter to evil by counterfeit good; the pander and advocate of the passions and appetites; ever in league with, and always first applying to, the Desire, as the inferior nature in man, the woman in our humanity; and through the Desihe prevailing on the Will) the Mare-hood, Virtus) against the command of the universal reason, and against the light of reason in the Will itself. This essential inherence of an intelligential principle ($, c vofpov) in the Will (dpi) ftknruci), ) or rather the Will itself thus considered, the Greeks expressed by an appropriate word fiovXfi. This, but little differing from Origen's interpretation or hypothesis, is supported and confirmed by the very old tradition of the homo androgynus, that is, that the original man, the individual first created, was bi-sexual: a...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 172 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 9mm | 318g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123674909X
  • 9781236749093