1-2-1 Discipleship

1-2-1 Discipleship : Helping One Another Grow Spiritually

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"Lack of depth and maturity in the worldwide church is a major problem. Very few Christians really know their Bibles well and can apply the Word to their daily lives. Few really live as "salt and light" in a dark world. Most make little impact for the Kingdom or know how to share their faith simply and in such a way that people want to listen. Sadly many are not even aware their Christian lives could be any different and so they live frustrated.


Could it be that we have failed to follow what Jesus commanded? His very last command before he returned to heaven was very simple "Go and make disciples of all nations, baptising them in the name of the Father, Son and Spirit and teaching them all I've commanded you. And surely I am with you even to the end of the age" (Matt. 28:18-20).


A person's last words before they die or leave should be important and Jesus certainly wasn't going to waste the opportunity when his disciples were listening so intently... Make disciples - Jesus knew that if his disciples did that, then all else that might be necessary would follow on. If we get the discipling part right then the church will grow and the church can become wide AND deep, giving life and refreshment instead of only disappointment and frustration.


This book aims to explain what discipleship is and give practical guidelines for discipling others. I feel compelled to write it because few seem to have been discipled themselves and good books on the topic seem surprisingly scarce. I was one of those who had to learn everything by trial and error. This book is the kind that I was looking for but didn't find. I hope this might ensure your way is a little easier.' Christine Dillon
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Product details

  • Paperback | 160 pages
  • 130 x 198 x 15.24mm | 180g
  • Tain, United Kingdom
  • English
  • Revised ed
  • 1845504259
  • 9781845504250
  • 270,342

Flap copy

"Lack of depth and maturity in the worldwide church is a major problem. Very few Christians really know their Bibles well and can apply the Word to their daily lives. Few really live as "salt and light" in a dark world. Most make little impact for the Kingdom or know how to share their faith simply and in such a way that people want to listen. Sadly many are not even aware their Christian lives could be any different and so they live frustrated. Could it be that we have failed to follow what Jesus commanded? His very last command before he returned to heaven was very simple "Go and make disciples of all nations, baptising them in the name of the Father, Son and Spirit and teaching them all I've commanded you. And surely I am with you even to the end of the age" (Matthew 28: 18-20).
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Review quote

... biblical, easy to read, extremely practical, and has useful questions for reflection. It's enough to get your teeth into if you've been involved in discipling already, but not overwhelming if you're thinking of taking up the challenge and need some help. -- Evangelicals Now This book was sent as a gift to me by Christian Focus when I wrote to them asking for another book. What a pleasant surprise! Helping Christians along the path to discipleship is something everyone says is an urgent need worldwide but which few really practice. It is not an impossibly hard task, and could be one of the most enriching experiences for a Christian. This book explains the process in an easy to digest and practical way. Highly recommended! -- Ajith Fernando
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About Christine Dillon

Christine Dillon is a missionary with OMF in Taiwan where she is involved in discipling and training churches. She says 'Please also pray as you go, that God will use you for his glory to disciple others'.
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Rating details

21 ratings
3.85 out of 5 stars
5 29% (6)
4 29% (6)
3 43% (9)
2 0% (0)
1 0% (0)

Our customer reviews

I had low expectations of this book. Quite low in fact. My confession is that when I saw it was written by a former student of SMBC (whose name I recognised but whom I don't know) and published by the same company that publishes books by the principal of SMBC, I assumed that he had pulled a few strings and got her into print. I assume that such arrangements are common place, and that if a book ever comes out with my name on the cover it will be because someone has called in some significant favour. But, having never heard of Christine Dillon other than as a missionary to be prayed for, I expected a book that was more self-indulgent than useful, kind of like a blog! But this is a great book! And one that I cannot recommend highly enough. Here's why: your local Christian book store for a book on one-to-one Christian discipleship and I suspect that, apart from a couple of youth titles, you will probably come up empty handed. Certainly there does not appear to be anything like it written from a reformed perspective, and, if they exist at all, fewer still written from a non-American perspective. Now, an American perspective is no bad thing, and I think Aussie and British Christians have a lot to learn from their American brothers and sisters in many areas, but there is a massive cultural gulf between us and them. Dillon is an Australian (I think) who works as a church planter in Taiwan. Apparently she wrote this book because 'good books on the topic seem surprising scarce' (p.8), and by the scarceness I was surprised as well. Perhaps it is little wonder that very few Christians have Christian mentors, and that fewer still have disciples! 2. It's practical. I love thick biblical commentaries and I love systematic theologies (which are all thick, if not 3 volumes). But for a book subtitles 'helping one another grow spiritually', a slender, practical volume was called for. And this one is immensely practical. I found the chapters 'Types of One-to-One Discipling' and 'What is the Goal of Discipling?' to be particularly useful and was particularly helped by their distinctions between formal and informal discipleship, and the suggestion that one of the goals of discipling is to prepare for suffering (p.31). I think that any book that acknowledges the likelihood of Christian suffering is better than the pop-psychology, self-help crap that occupies most of the shelf space at most Christian booksellers, and to include that as a function of discipleship is very helpful indeed. While sections details the steps to discerning who, where and when to disciple at first seem rather too prescriptive, they contain useful information that one would be foolish not to take on board in to some extent or other. 3. It's Biblical. I can imagine many churches encouraging people to disciple others, as modelled in the Bible. There would be appeals to various parts of Scripture, and the obligatory inclusion of the Great Commission. Dillon includes all of that, and the book is grounded in the Bible, but that's not what I mean. The biblical-ness of this book is that it assumes that discipleship will be 'the process of becoming more like Jesus, as we are transformed by the Holy Spirit' (p.13) and that that will only happen through faithful, diligent study of the Word of God. Don't read me wrong here; Dillon's view of discipleship is much more that private Bible study, and it is a costly exercise that involves sacrifice, commitment and diligence. She does not say that the Bible be opened at every meeting. However it is clear that the Bible is what is being used to inform and enable Christ-like transformation by the Holy Spirit. To this end, there are a number of useful sections on reading the Bible with your disciple, and teaching the disciple to study the Bible themselves. 4. It's reflective. Each chapter contains opportunities for reflection. Now at this point, a lot of Christian books would have opted for a limp-wristed approach to reflection requiring you to contemplate how you feel, if not express them in some form of journal. Dillon's points for reflection require the reader to think practically and theologically, and to acknowledge deep biblical truths as they prepare to disciple others. I have very few criticisms of 1-2-1 Discipleship, and as you will see, those that I do have are relatively minor. Firstly, while the cover design is catchy and engaging, the typeface is stupid. Apparently colophon's used to include details of the font so you knew who (or rather which font) to blame. No such details are included, probably for obvious reasons, but it is a font that is difficult to read and should be reserved for wedding invitations and the like. And secondly, I would have loved to hear Christine Dillon's thoughts on how we create a culture of discipleship. How can it be taught from the pulpit? How can it be facilitated through encouragement and equipping? In many ways it's a difficult thing to for a person to approach a more mature Christian and ask to be discipled. But perhaps it's an even more difficult thing for a more mature Christian to approach another and ask if they would like to be discipled (especially in Australia where the only thing worse than affirming another person is affirming yourself). Either way, it's got to be that more mature Christian who takes the initiative in discipleship, and this book will greatly assist by motivating that response and equipping those that God has called. Chris Ashton http://chrisashton.com.au/show more
by Mr Chris Ashton
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