It's a Book
17%
off

It's a Book

By (author) Lane Smith

US$10.76US$12.99

You save US$2.23

Free delivery worldwide

Available
Dispatched in 3 business days

When will my order arrive?

Playful and lighthearted with a subversive twist that is signature Lane Smith, IT'S A BOOK is a delightful manifesto on behalf of print in the digital age. This satisfying, perfectly executed picture book has something to say to readers of all stripes and all ages.

show more
  • Hardback | 32 pages
  • 205.74 x 256.54 x 7.62mm | 340.19g
  • 01 Sep 2010
  • Roaring Brook Press
  • New York, NY
  • English
  • colour illustrations
  • 1596436069
  • 9781596436060
  • 4,167

Other books in this category

Other people who viewed this bought:

Author Information

Lane Smith has written and illustrated a bunch of stuff, including "It's a Book"; "John, Paul, George & Ben" and "Madam President." His titles with Jon Scieszka have included the Caldecott Honor-winner "The Stinky Cheese Man"; "The True Story" "of the 3 Little Pigs"; "Math Curse"; and "Science Verse." Lane's other high profile titles include "Hooray for Diffendoofer Day"! by Dr. Seuss and Jack Prelutsky; "The Very Persistent Gappers of Frip" by George Saunders; "Big Plans" by Bob Shea; and "James and the Giant Peach" by Roald Dahl. In 1996 Lane served as Conceptual Designer on the Disney film version of "James and the Giant Peach." Lane also wrote and illustrated the retro, cult favorites, "The Happy Hocky Family" and "The Happy Hocky Family Moves to the Country." Like the Hocky family, he and book designer Molly Leach live in a little town in the country.

show more

Review quote

“I do love this book.” —"The New Yorker," Book Bench section“Those of us for whom books are a faith in themselves — who find the notion that pixels, however ordered, could be any kind of substitute for the experience of reading in a chair with the strange thing spread open on our lap — will love this book. Though it will surely draw a laugh from kids, it will give even more pleasure to parents who have been trying to make loudly the point that Smith’s book makes softly: that the virtues of a book are independent of any bells, whistles or animation it might be made to contain.   . .  . For in trying to make the case for books to our kids, exactly the case we want to make is not that they can compete with the virtues of computer or screens, but that they do something else: that they allow for a soulfulness the screens, with their jumpy impersonality, cannot duplicate . . . The moral of Smith’s book is the right one: not

show more

Customer reviews

Talking to the digital natives ...

This delightfully witty story is guaranteed to bring a smile to your face as Ape tries to teach Jack-Ass about the wonders of books - even though they don't use a mouse, make sounds or connect to the rest of the world. Beautiful depiction of Generation Z!show more
by Katie Tomic