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The Robe of Skulls

The Robe of Skulls

Paperback

By (author) Vivian French, Illustrated by Ross Collins

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  • Publisher: Walker Books Ltd
  • Format: Paperback | 208 pages
  • Dimensions: 204mm x 292mm x 10mm | 181g
  • Publication date: 4 June 2007
  • Publication City/Country: London
  • ISBN 10: 0744583616
  • ISBN 13: 9780744583618
  • Sales rank: 335,821

Product description

All is not well in the crumbling castle high above the mountain village of Fracture. The sorceress Lady Lamorna has her heart set on a new robe. It is a very expensive new robe. To get the cash she will stop at nothing, including kidnapping, blackmail and more than a little black magic. But she reckons without the heroic Gracie Gillypot, not to mention a gallant if rather scruffy prince, two chatty bats, the wickedest stepsister ever, a troll with a grudge - and some very Ancient crones.

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Author information

Vivian French is a professional storyteller and an acclaimed children's author. She is the author of the Read and Wonder non-fiction books Caterpillar Butterfly (shortlisted for the Kurt Maschler Award) and Growing Frogs, as well as the bestselling Tiara Club series. Vivian lives in Edinburgh. Ross Collins is an acclaimed author and illustrator, winner of the 1994 Macmillan Prize for Illustration. His popular children's titles include Germs, The Three Grumpies by Tamra Wright and the Little Hero series by John Grant. He lives in Glasgow.

Editorial reviews

Conceiving a burning desire for a new gown - black velvet, decorated with poison ivy, spider webs and skulls - wicked Lady Lamorna decides to pay for it by turning all the local princes into frogs and extracting ransoms from their royal parents. She gets help on the way from the considerably more clever Foyce Undershaft, a young lady of stunning beauty and "a heart as hard as a frying pan," who is also the evil stepsister of kindly Gracie Gillypot. Enter Marlon, a bat who addresses young folk as "kiddo" and is forever flitting off with a "Ciao!" to deliver messages or orchestrate some dodgy deal. Thanks to his efforts Gracie hooks up with Marcus, a scruffy prince missed in the general amphibious transformation, to rescue the other princes and to trick Foyce into entering a magical sort of rehabilitation program. Lady Lamorna even gets her gown, in the end. Larded with stock comical characters and illustrated with Collins's gangly, Beardsley-esque line drawings, the story will slip down like the bonbon it is. (Fantasy. 10-12) (Kirkus Reviews)