How We Decide

How We Decide

Paperback

By (author) Jonah Lehrer

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  • Publisher: HOUGHTON MIFFLIN
  • Format: Paperback | 302 pages
  • Dimensions: 135mm x 201mm x 20mm | 318g
  • Publication date: 14 January 2010
  • Publication City/Country: Boston
  • ISBN 10: 0547247990
  • ISBN 13: 9780547247991
  • Edition: 1
  • Edition statement: Reprint
  • Sales rank: 16,481

Product description

The first book to use the unexpected discoveries of neuroscience to help us make the best decisions Since Plato, philosophers have described the decision-making process as either rational or emotional: we carefully deliberate, or we "blink" and go with our gut. But as scientists break open the mind's black box with the latest tools of neuroscience, they're discovering that this is not how the mind works. Our best decisions are a finely tuned blend of both feeling and reason--and the precise mix depends on the situation. When buying a house, for example, it's best to let our unconscious mull over the many variables. But when we're picking a stock, intuition often leads us astray. The trick is to determine when to use the different parts of the brain, and to do this, we need to think harder (and smarter) about how we think. Jonah Lehrer arms us with the tools we need, drawing on cutting-edge research as well as the real-world experiences of a wide range of "deciders"--from airplane pilots and hedge fund investors to serial killers and poker players. Lehrer shows how people are taking advantage of the new science to make better television shows, win more football games, and improve military intelligence. His goal is to answer two questions that are of interest to just about anyone, from CEOs to firefighters: How does the human mind make decisions? And how can we make those decisions better?

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Review quote

"Cash or credit? Punt or go for first down? Deal or no deal? Life is filled with puzzling choices. Reporting from the frontiers of neuroscience and armed with riveting case studies of how pilots, quarterbacks, and others act under fire, Jonah Lehrer presents a dazzlingly authoritative and accessible account of how we make decisions, what's happening in our heads as we do so, and how we might all become better 'deciders.' Luckily, this one's a no-brainer: Read this book."--Tom Vanderbilt, author of "Traffic: Why We Drive the Way We Do (and What It Says About Us) ""Over the past two decades, research in neuroscience and behavioral economics has revolutionized our understanding of human decision making. Jonah Lehrer brings it all together in this insightful and enjoyable book, giving readers the information they need to make the smartest decisions."--Antonio Damasio, author of "Descartes' Error and Looking for Spinoza ""Jonah Lehrer ingeniously weaves neuroscience, sports, war, psychology, and politics into a fascinating tale of human decision making. In the process, he makes us much wiser."--Dan Ariely, author of "Predictably Irrational " "Should we go with instinct or analysis? The answer, Lehrer explains, in this smart and delightfully readable book, is that it depends on the situation. Knowing which method works best in which case is not just useful but fascinating. Lehrer proves once again that he's a master storyteller and one of the best guides to the practical lessons from new neuroscience."--Chris Anderson, editor in chief of "Wired" and author of "The Long Tail " "As Lehrer describes in fluid prose, the brain's reasoning centers are easily fooled, often making judgments based on nonrational factors like presentation (a sales pitch or packaging)...Lehrer is a delight to read, and this is a fascinating book (some of which appeared recently, in a slightly different form, in the New Yorker) that will help everyone better understand thems

Back cover copy

Praise for Jonah Lehrer and How We Decide "Jonah Lehrer is a brilliant young writer. His clear and vivid writing--incisive and thoughtful, yet sensitive and modest--is a special pleasure."--Oliver Sacks "Cash or credit? Punt or go for first down? Deal or no deal? Life is filled with puzzling choices. Reporting from the frontiers of neuroscience and armed with riveting case studies of how pilots, quarterbacks, and others act under fire, Jonah Lehrer presents a dazzlingly authoritative and accessible account of how we make decisions, what's happening in our heads as we do so, and how we might all become better 'deciders.' Luckily, this one's a no-brainer: Read this book."--Tom Vanderbilt, author of Traffic: Why We Drive the Way We Do (and What It Says About Us) "Over the past two decades, research in neuroscience and behavioral economics has revolutionized our understanding of human decision making. Jonah Lehrer brings it all together in this insightful and enjoyable book, giving readers the information they need to make the smartest decisions."--Antonio Damasio, author of Descartes' Error and Looking for Spinoza "Jonah Lehrer ingeniously weaves neuroscience, sports, war, psychology, and politics into a fascinatingtale of human decision making. In the process, he makes us much wiser."--Dan Ariely, author of Predictably Irrational "Should we go with instinct or analysis? The answer, Lehrer explains, in this smart and delightfully readable book, is that it depends on the situation. Knowing which method works best in which case is not just useful but fascinating. Lehrer proves once again that he's a master storyteller and one of the best guides to the practical lessons from new neuroscience."--Chris Anderson, editor in chief of Wired and author of The Long Tail "An inviting, high-velocity ride through our most treasured mental act--deciding. This is truly one of the most accessible and richly informed books on human choice. It's a must-read for anyone interested in the human mind and how cutting-edge research changes the way we think about ourselves. A marvelous success."--Read Montague, Brown Foundation Professor of Neuroscience, Baylor College of Medicine