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Bridget Jones's Diary: A Novel

Bridget Jones's Diary: A Novel

Paperback Picador

By (author) Helen Fielding

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  • Publisher: PICADOR
  • Format: Paperback | 320 pages
  • Dimensions: 111mm x 178mm x 20mm | 167g
  • Publication date: 1 April 2001
  • Publication City/Country: London
  • ISBN 10: 0330375253
  • ISBN 13: 9780330375252
  • Edition: Media tie-in
  • Edition statement: Media tie-in
  • Illustrations note: colour illustrations
  • Sales rank: 17,114

Product description

Bridget Jones's Diary was first published in 1996 and applauded by critics from Salman Rushdie to Jilly Cooper. A number one best-seller, Helen Fielding's book has sold over fifteen million copies worldwide and has been turned into an Academy Award-nominated film starring Renee Zellweger, Colin Firth and Hugh Grant. Bridget Jones's Diary is followed by Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason and Bridget Jones: Mad About the Boy. Bridget Jones is everyone's favourite spinster. In Bridget Jones's Diary she documents her struggles through the social minefield of her 30s and tries to weigh up the eternal question: Daniel Cleaver of Mark Darcy? She is supported through the whole process by four indispensable friends, Shazzer, Jude, Tom and a bottle of chardonnay. A dazzling urban satire of modern relationships? An ironic, tragic insight into the demise of the nuclear family? Or the confused ramblings of a pissed thirty-something?

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Author information

Helen Fielding was born in Yorkshire. She worked for many years in London as a newspaper and TV journalist, travelling as wildly and as often as possible to Africa, India and Central America. She is the author of Cause Celeb (1994), Bridget Jones's Diary (1996), Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason (2000), Olivia Joules and the Overactive Imagination (2003), and Bridget Jones: Mad About the Boy (2013). She co-wrote the screenplays for the movies of Bridget Jones's Diary and The Edge of Reason, starring Renee Zellweger, Colin Firth and Hugh Grant. She nows works full-time as a novelist and screenwriter and lives in London and Los Angeles.

Review quote

'The best, the original, the seminal' Mail on Sunday 'Helen Fielding is one of the funniest writers in Britain and Bridget Jones is a creation of comic genius' Nick Hornby 'Bridget Jones's Diary rings with the unmistakable tone of something that is true to the marrow. It defines what it describes' Nicola Shulman, Times Literary Supplement 'A brilliant comic creation. Even men will laugh' Salman Rushdie 'I cannot recommend a book more joyfully ... Hilariously funny, miraculously observed, endlessly touching' Jilly Cooper, Daily Telegraph 'Effortlessly addictive ... [Bridget Jones's] hilarious diary presents a perfect zeitgeist of single female woes' Sunday Express 'Wild comedy ... observed with merciless, flamboyant wit. A gloriously funny book' Sunday Times 'A brilliant evocation of life as a single girl in a certain time ... reads like Anita Loos out of Jane Austen, and any woman who has ever had a job, a relationship or indeed a mother will read it and roar' The Times

Editorial reviews

Newspaper columnist Fielding's first effort, a bestseller in Britain, lives up to the hype: This year in the life of a single woman is closely observed and laugh-out-loud funny. Bridget, a thirtysomething with a midlevel publishing job, tempers her self-loathing with a giddy (if sporadic) urge toward self-improvement: Every day she tallies cigarettes smoked, alcohol "units" consumed, and pounds gained or lost. At Una Alconbury's New Year's Day Curry Buffet, her parents and their friends hover as she's introduced to an eligible man, Mark Darcy. Mark is wearing a diamond-patterned sweater that rules him out as a potential lust object, but Bridget's reflexive rudeness causes her to ruminate on her own undesirability and thus to binge on chocolate Christmas-tree decorations. But in the subsequent days, she cheers herself up with fantasies of Daniel, her boss's boss, a handsome rogue with an enticingly dissolute air. After a breathless exchange of e-mail messages about the length of her skirt, Daniel asks for her phone number, causing Bridget to crown herself sex goddess. . . until she spends a miserable weekend staring at her silent phone. By chanting "aloof, unavailable ice-queen" to herself, she manages to play it cool long enough to engage Daniel's interest, but once he's her boyfriend, he spends Sundays with the shades pulled watching TV - and is quickly unfaithful. Meanwhile, after decades of marriage, her mother acquires a bright orange suntan, moves out of the house, and takes up with a purse-carrying smoothie named Julio. And so on. Bridget navigates culinary disasters, mood swings, and scary publishing parties; she cares for her parents, talks endlessly with her cronies, and maybe, just maybe, hooks up with a nice boyfriend. Fielding's diarist raises prickly insecurities to an art form, turns bad men into good anecdotes, and shows that it is possible to have both a keen eye for irony and a generous heart. (Kirkus Reviews)