Book Depository Blog

RSS

 

  • The Future of Islam

    Fri, 05 Mar 2010 06:47

    Writing about John L Esposito's vital new book The Future of Islam, Eugene Rogan, writing in the Financial Times argued: "President Barack Obama travelled to Cairo in June 2009 to promise a new beginning between the US and the Muslim world based on "mutual interest and mutual respect". In The Future of Islam, John Esposito has written the handbook for this new age of engagement. Intolerant of the extremists bent on provoking a clash of civilisations -- western Islamophobes and violent Islamists alike -- Esposito's book is a calculated appeal to the moderate middle ground upon whom the success of Obama's policies depends."

    John L. Esposito is one of the world's leading authorities on Islam. Now, in this brilliant portrait of Islam today -- and tomorrow -- he draws on a lifetime of thought and research to sweep away the negative stereotypes and provide an accurate, richly nuanced, and revelatory account of the fastest growing religion in the world. Here Esposito explores the major questions and issues that face Islam in the 21st century and that will deeply affect global politics.

    Are Islam and the West locked in a deadly clash of civilizations? Is Islam compatible with democracy and human rights? Will religious fundamentalism block the development of modern societies in the Islamic world? Will Islam overwhelm the Western societies in which so many Muslim immigrants now reside? Will Europe become Eurabia or will the Muslims assimilate? Which Muslim thinkers will be most influential in the years to come?

    To answer this last question he introduces the reader to a new generation of Muslim thinkers -- Tariq Ramadan, Timothy Winter, Mustafa Ceric, Amina Wadud, and others -- a diverse collection of Muslim men and women, both the "Martin Luthers" and the "Billy Grahams" of Islam. We meet religious leaders who condemn suicide bombing and who see the killing of unarmed men, women, and children as "worse than murder," who preach toleration and pluralism, who advocate for women's rights. The book often underscores the unexpected similarities between the Islamic world and the West and at times turns the mirror on the US, revealing how we appear to Muslims, all to highlight the crucial point that there is nothing exceptional about the Muslim faith. Recent decades have brought extraordinary changes in the Muslim world, and in addressing all of these issues, Esposito paints a complex picture of Islam in all its diversity -- a picture of urgent importance as we face the challenges of the twenty-first century.

  • Writing about John L Esposito's vital new book The Future of Islam, Eugene Rogan, writing in the Financial Times argued: "President Barack Obama travelled to Cairo in June 2009 to promise a new beginning between the US and the Muslim world based on "mutual interest and mutual respect". In The Future of Islam, John Esposito has written the handbook for this new age of engagement. Intolerant of the extremists bent on provoking a clash of civilisations -- western Islamophobes and violent Islamists alike -- Esposito's book is a calculated appeal to the moderate middle ground upon whom the success of Obama's policies depends."

    John L. Esposito is one of the world's leading authorities on Islam. Now, in this brilliant portrait of Islam today -- and tomorrow -- he draws on a lifetime of thought and research to sweep away the negative stereotypes and provide an accurate, richly nuanced, and revelatory account of the fastest growing religion in the world. Here Esposito explores the major questions and issues that face Islam in the 21st century and that will deeply affect global politics.

    Are Islam and the West locked in a deadly clash of civilizations? Is Islam compatible with democracy and human rights? Will religious fundamentalism block the development of modern societies in the Islamic world? Will Islam overwhelm the Western societies in which so many Muslim immigrants now reside? Will Europe become Eurabia or will the Muslims assimilate? Which Muslim thinkers will be most influential in the years to come?

    To answer this last question he introduces the reader to a new generation of Muslim thinkers -- Tariq Ramadan, Timothy Winter, Mustafa Ceric, Amina Wadud, and others -- a diverse collection of Muslim men and women, both the "Martin Luthers" and the "Billy Grahams" of Islam. We meet religious leaders who condemn suicide bombing and who see the killing of unarmed men, women, and children as "worse than murder," who preach toleration and pluralism, who advocate for women's rights. The book often underscores the unexpected similarities between the Islamic world and the West and at times turns the mirror on the US, revealing how we appear to Muslims, all to highlight the crucial point that there is nothing exceptional about the Muslim faith. Recent decades have brought extraordinary changes in the Muslim world, and in addressing all of these issues, Esposito paints a complex picture of Islam in all its diversity -- a picture of urgent importance as we face the challenges of the twenty-first century.

  • Lorrie Moore's acclaimed novel of the tensions of family and race, A Gate at the Stairs, has just been shortlisted for a PEN/Faulkner award:

    In her dazzling new novel -- her first in over a decade -- Lorrie Moore turns her eye on the anxiety and disconnection of post-9/11 America.

    With her government quietly gearing up for war in the Middle East, twenty-year-old Tassie Keltjin, a "half-Jewish" farmer's daughter from the plains of the Midwest, has come to the university town of Troy -- a girl escaping her provincial home to encounter the complex world of culture and politics.

    When she takes a job as a part-time nanny to a couple who seem at once mysterious and glamorous, Tassie is drawn more deeply into the life of their newly adopted child and a household that steadily reveals its complications. With her past becoming increasingly alien to her -- her parents seem older when she visits; her disillusioned brother ever more fixed on joining the military -- Tassie finds herself becoming more and more the stranger she feels herself to be. As the year unfolds, love leads her to new and formative experiences, but it is then that the past and the future burst forth in dramatic and shocking ways.

    Refracted through the eyes of this memorable narrator, A Gate at the Stairs is a lyrical, beguiling and wise novel of our times.

  • Lorrie Moore's acclaimed novel of the tensions of family and race, A Gate at the Stairs, has just been shortlisted for a PEN/Faulkner award:

    In her dazzling new novel -- her first in over a decade -- Lorrie Moore turns her eye on the anxiety and disconnection of post-9/11 America.

    With her government quietly gearing up for war in the Middle East, twenty-year-old Tassie Keltjin, a "half-Jewish" farmer's daughter from the plains of the Midwest, has come to the university town of Troy -- a girl escaping her provincial home to encounter the complex world of culture and politics.

    When she takes a job as a part-time nanny to a couple who seem at once mysterious and glamorous, Tassie is drawn more deeply into the life of their newly adopted child and a household that steadily reveals its complications. With her past becoming increasingly alien to her -- her parents seem older when she visits; her disillusioned brother ever more fixed on joining the military -- Tassie finds herself becoming more and more the stranger she feels herself to be. As the year unfolds, love leads her to new and formative experiences, but it is then that the past and the future burst forth in dramatic and shocking ways.

    Refracted through the eyes of this memorable narrator, A Gate at the Stairs is a lyrical, beguiling and wise novel of our times.

  • The Seattle Times on Thomas Mullen's latest novel The Many Deaths of the Firefly Brothers:

    Few things are certain in Thomas Mullen's latest novel, including death. The Many Deaths of the Firefly Brothers is set during the Great Depression, when criminals like Bonnie and Clyde, "Pretty Boy" Floyd and John Dillinger became folk heroes for many of the downtrodden who saw banks as the enemy. Life was violent, and so was death. For Jason and Whit Fireson -- dubbed the Firefly Brothers by the press -- death was also a recurring event.

    Mullen follows up his acclaimed debut novel, The Last Town on Earth, with a mysterious and compelling romp through the 1930s, when the FBI was out to make a name for itself and the world was full of poverty and discontent.

    The Many Deaths of the Firefly Brothers opens with a very puzzled Jason waking up befuddled and trying to figure out what's going on: "He was a man well accustomed to waking up in unorthodox positions and in all manner of settings. He'd slept on floors, in the pillowless crevices of old couch frames, amid the nettles and haylofts... But this was something different."

    Indeed. Jason and Whit, each bearing bloody bullet holes after being on the losing end of a gunfight, awaken in the dirty backroom of a police station where their naked bodies have been dumped. Word of their demise spreads, even as police invent a story of stolen bodies to explain their mysterious disappearance (more...)

  • Showing 11 to 15 of 141 results < Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next >
  • Can't find what you're looking for? Try our below.

Book Depository Team
Publisher Blogs