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  • Bookseller redux banner

    Each Monday, here on Editor's Corner, I run through the latest issue of the Bookseller magazine and pick out the bits and pieces of book industry news that catch my eye.

    This quick round-up of book stuff is culled from the pages of last Friday's 14th August issue:

    • the Home Office "has been accused of 'unfair and anti-competitive actions' over the contract to publish the official guide to the British Citizenship exam"
    • Borders UK c.e.o. Philip Downer "has said he is 'addressing' concerns riased by auditors Ernst & Young, after it expressed doubt about the retailer's ability to continue trading"
    • the "digitisation of the publishing industry has 'exposed existing skill gaps' some of which are 'critical', warns the sector skills council Skillset"
    • HarperCollins "has said its most recent financial year was 'exceptionally difficult' after profits at the worldwide business collapsed from $160m (£97m) to $17m (£10.3m)"
    • Faber's "200 e-books are to be made available to all UK mobile phone subscribers through GoSpoken.com, the mobile platform founded by author Andy McNab"
    • a "'Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy' convention will take place in October to make the 30th anniversary of the famous Douglas Adams series (12th October) and publication of the authorised sequel from Eoin Colfer, And Another Thing...
    • Penguin's "market share of the travel sector has grown since the beginning of its exclusive deal on foreign travel guides with W H Smith Travel but sales still remain down year on year"
    • British Bookshops "is looking to double its books range in a bid to reverse its fortunes. Around 100 jobs, both full-time and part-time positions, could also go as part of the review of the business initiated last month"
    • Simon & Schuster's "UK's turnover was 3% down in the first half of 2009, according to its managing director Ian Chapman"
    • acclaimed biographer "Claire Tomalin's next title will be a biography of novelist Charles Dickens published under the Penguin imprint Viking, due out in hardback in 2011"
  • Bookseller redux banner

    Each Monday, here on Editor's Corner, I run through the latest issue of the Bookseller magazine and pick out the bits and pieces of book industry news that catch my eye.

    This quick round-up of book stuff is culled from the pages of last Friday's 7th August issue:

    • retailers are "predicting heavier discounting this Christmas as the recommended retail price for hardbacks hits the £20 benchmark"
    • Anthony Cheetham "is to join Atlantic early this autumn with plans to set up an 'entirely new activity' within the publishing house"
    • Transworld will "whip up a Dan Brown frenzy with a marketing and PR campaign starting a week before global release of The Lost Symbol on 15th September"
    • the Random House Group's turnover "for 2008 is understood to have reached just under £295m, showing a rise of almost 6% on 2007"
    • books "accounted for £547.9m of HMV Group's sales in its latest financial year"
    • recruitment agencies "have urged that guidelines on payment for interns be introduced to ensure future talent is not turned off the industry"
    • Italian philosopher "Umberto Eco will publish a companion volume to On Beauty and On Ugliness with MacLehose Press"
    • Weidenfeld & Nicolson "has bought a one-volume history of the Second World War from Antony Beevor, due out in 2012"
    • sales rep force "Amalgamated Book Services has been put into administration after its owner and director Richard Squibb suffered a stroke last month"
    • Hodder and Stoughton "will republish Sir Bobby Robson's autobiography as a commemorative edition following the former England manager's death from cancer"

     

  • Bookseller redux banner

    Each Monday, here on Editor's Corner, I run through the latest issue of the Bookseller magazine and pick out the bits and pieces of book industry news that catch my eye.

    This quick round-up of book stuff is culled from the pages of last Friday's 31st July issue:

    • Supermarkets now sell "one in every five books bought in the UK"
    • Sony is believed to be launching a "new version of its Reader, which will include wi-fi access"
    • South London Independent bookseller "Crockatt and Powell has closed this week after almost four years of trading"
    • Waterstone's hub "up and running" "Waterstone's will begin supplying almost all of its stores from its new distribution centre by the end of this week"
    • "The three small publishers [Quadrille, The History Press and Michael O'Mara] who have seen the largest drop-off in sales in the first half of the year" remain confident about future trading"
    • Comedian Simon Pegg followed Russell Brand "in postponing the release of his title...autobiography 'Out of Spaced', first of a three book deal struck for seven figures last year, has been pushed back to next autumn"
    • Poetry publisher Salt "has raised enough money to get through the rest of this year after the success of its 'Just One Book' campaign"
    • Jacqueline Wilson "will turn her hand to full-length historical fiction for the first time this autumn, with a book set in London's first home for abandoned children"
    • The book trade "has hailed a 'strong' longlist for the 2009 Man Booker Prize, which was revealed on Tuesday. Many retailers commented on the 'curveball' inclusion of James Lever's 'Me Cheeta', with several tipping Hilary Mantel's 'Wolf Hall'...as a potential winner"
  • Bookseller redux banner

    Each Monday, here on Editor's Corner, I run through the latest issue of the Bookseller magazine and pick out the bits and pieces of book industry news that catch my eye.

    This quick round-up of book stuff is culled from the pages of last Friday's 24th July issue:

    • Random House UK "has come under fire from literary agents for offering e-book royalty rates below other publishers"
    • a UK version of the "Kindle e-book reader is expected this autumn"
    • Borders UK c.e.o. Philip Downer "has warned of a continuing 'tough environment' for retail following last week's management buyout of the high street chain"
    • Little, Brown imprint Atom "is planning to bring out a graphic novel based on Stephenie Meyer's bestselling series Twilight
    • New Holland "is to publish an authorised biography of Amy Winehouse this Christmas as the publisher looks to expand its mainstream offer"
    • at least "seven peers from the House of Lords have voiced their opposition to the mooted criminal memoirs gag currently under debate, arguing it is 'vague', 'broad' and potentially damaging to free speech
    • Harvill Secker publishing director "Liz Foley has bought Henning Mankell's first new Kurt Wallander novel for 10 years"
    • The Publishers Association "will file a submission to the European Union about Google's book-scanning programme, as part of the EU's consultation into the deal"
    • radical publisher Verso "has seen its sales increase by more than 33% in the first six months of 2009, its best half-year sales for four years"
    • Two Ravens Press "will sell e-books direct at half the price of the print edition... DRM-free, but they will be watermarked and numbered"
  • Bookseller redux banner

    Each Monday, here on Editor's Corner, I run through the latest issue of the Bookseller magazine and pick out the bits and pieces of book industry news that catch my eye.

    This quick round-up of book stuff is culled from the pages of last Friday's 17th July issue:

    • Borders UK "could change ownership twice in as many years amid increasing speculation that it will be taken over by distressed debt specialists Hilco"...
    • ... and "is in consultation with more than 100 staff about their futures after it sold the leases on five stores, including its London flagship branch, to fashion chain New Look"
    • Hachette UK "has strengthened its market position over the first half of this year, growing value sales despite a declining wider market and pulling away from its three biggest rivals"
    • sales growth "is up across most academic publishers, fuelled by people flocking into education to retrain or better their career prospects in the current recession"
    • the "Publishers Association and the Independent Publishers Guild are to lobby with a 'single voice' on industry issues focusing on copyright, digital rights and territoriality"
    • Simon & Schuster and HarperCollins "have tied in the race to be first to market with a new Michael Jackson book, following the singer's death on 25th June"
    • Adele Parks "is moving from long-term publisher Penguin to Headline in a move involving a 'multi-book' deal"
    • UK agents "have slammed as 'horrendous' and 'destructive' proposals put to the Australian government to remove restrictions on the importation of books"
    • staffing "at Penguin's New Delhi office could double over the next three years as its Dorling Kindersley subsidiary becomes 'the first global consumer publishing company run in India'"
    • the "decline in worldwide travel books sales has had a 'considerable impact' on Lonely Planet"
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