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  • Bookseller redux banner

    Each Monday, here on Editor's Corner, I run through the latest issue of the Bookseller magazine and pick out the bits and pieces of book industry news that catch my eye.

    This quick round-up of book stuff is culled from the pages of last Friday's 25th September issue and via the Bookseller website:

    • the Society of Chief Librarians "has announced a new scheme enabling readers to borrow books and other items from any public library in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. More than 4,000 libraries have signed up to the scheme, which becomes operational today (28th September). The new system means that users need only show their existing library card, or proof of address, to join or access any library they are visiting. However any items borrowed must be returned to the library from where they came"
    • the BBC "has launched a competition to find 'the greatest real-life stories never told', with the prize of a publishing deal 'with a prestigious UK publishing house', now disclosed as HarperTrue. The prize, which could go to a maximum of five of the finalists, also includes an advance and royalties based on sales"
    • Constable & Robinson "will be publishing a spoof of Stephenie Meyer's Twilight as it attempts to "put the fun back" into publishing. Nightlight by The Harvard Lampoon will be released on 3rd November... It tells the story of Belle Goose, a vampire-obsessed girl, looking for love in all the wrong places"
    • the Society of Authors (SoA) "is to explore options for urgent collective action against the cuts in author advances, new chair of the SoA Tom Holland said this week. The news came as the acting president of the Association of Authors Agents Anthony Goff confirmed that advances were being cut by as much as 70%"
    • the judge "presiding over the Google Settlement has agreed to delay the Fairness Hearing at the request of the Association of American Publishers and US Authors Guild. But he added that the public would benefit from a 'a fair and reasonable settlement'"


  • Bookseller redux banner

    Each Monday, here on Editor's Corner, I run through the latest issue of the Bookseller magazine and pick out the bits and pieces of book industry news that catch my eye.

    This quick round-up of book stuff is culled from the pages of last Friday's 18th September issue and via the Bookseller website:

    • Google settlement is looking increasingly under pressure: "Google, the Authors Guild and the Association of American Publishers have said that they intend to 'address' concerns over the Google Settlement, after the US Justice Department (DOJ) urged the New York court presiding over the deal to reject it. The DOJ said the deal could not be passed in its current form, but was, according to one lawyer, 'fixable'. The DOJ indicated that ongoing talks with Google -- which a department official characterised as 'very constructive' -- could lead to changes that would make the settlement acceptable"
    • The director of the Frankfurt Book Fair (FBF) "has stressed that 'censorship will not take place' at this year's event, claiming that the idea that the organisers would be subject to or engage in censorship was 'false'"
    • Maxim Jakubowski, "writer, editor and former proprietor of crime bookshop Murder One, is to launch a new crime fiction imprint, maXcrime, for John Blake Publishing in March"
    • Social publishing "website Scribd has been hit with a lawsuit which claims that it profits by encouraging internet users to illegally share copyrighted books online"
    • Venezuelan president Hugo Chavez has started to implement a four-part color coded "Revolutionary Reading Plan." Announced in May, "the goal of the project as stated by the Venezuelan government, is 'the democratization of books and reading, with a new conception of reading as a collective act under the fundamental values and principles of revolutionary socialism'."


  • Bookseller redux banner

    Each Monday, here on Editor's Corner, I run through the latest issue of the Bookseller magazine and pick out the bits and pieces of book industry news that catch my eye.

    This quick round-up of book stuff is culled from the pages of last Friday's 11th September issue and via the Bookseller website:

    • the "Frankfurt Book Fair caused a diplomatic stir on Saturday after going back on its decision to stop two Chinese dissidents, Bei Ling and Dai Qing, appearing at a symposium about China ahead of the book fair. Their appearance at the event caused the official Chinese delegation to walk out, with the delegation only agreeing to return after an apology from Juergen Boos, director of the book fair"
    • The New York Times "has broken the embargo on the new Dan Brown book, The Lost Symbol, with a review of Brown's "third rip-snorting adventure". According to the newspaper, 'The Lost Symbol manages to take a twisting, turning route through many such aspects of the occult even as it heads for a final secret...'"
    • David & Charles "has recently completed a "radical" restructure of the company"
    • Directors at "Cambridge University Press spent nearly £330,000 on travel and entertaining in the year CUP laid off 50 staff. CUP chief executive Stephen Bourne and six other directors are reported by the Cambridge News to have spent £294,439 on travel and £33,911 on entertaining according to figures released under the Freedom of Information Act
    • the Government is to "spend "18m providing free books for babies and toddlers over the next three years... According to the Press Association, the cash will go on around 12 million volumes for children aged 0-3, to be handed out through GPs' surgeries, nurseries and Sure Start centres"
    • Ghanian author and performance poet "Nii Ayikwei Parkes is to take over from Patrick Ness in the role of Booktrust online writer in residence; the second writer to take part"
    • French Prime Minister Francois Fillon "has endorsed the idea that Google might digitise some books and documents of the French National Library. Closing a government seminar on the digital economy last week, he said that 'Google is not a problem, but a challenge'. Fillon dismissed the recent uproar over reports that the Bibliotheque Nationale de France (BNF) was in negotiations with Google. 'It would be shocking if it (the BNF) were not doing so,' he declared"
  • Bookseller redux banner

    Each Monday, here on Editor's Corner, I run through the latest issue of the Bookseller magazine and pick out the bits and pieces of book industry news that catch my eye.

    This quick round-up of book stuff is culled from the pages of last Friday's 28th August issue:

    • E-book prices "will have to come down to meet consumer demand and grow the market, Sony has warned"
    • W H Smith "looks like it is ready to spark an e-reader price war after offering the two new Sony e-readers at prices less than those being charged by Waterstone's"
    • Hachette Publishing "pushed its earnings before interest up by 61.1% to €112m in its half year to end-June, according to results put out by its parent company Lagardere Publishing. The French group said the 'excellent performance' was 'all the more remarkable given that the publishing sector is actually contracting slightly in all the markets where we operate'"
    • a title by "independent poetry publisher Salt, which staved off closure with its 'Just One Book' campaign earlier this year, has scored a nomination in this year's Guardian First Book Award longlist... Sian Hughes' The Missing joins a 10-strong list dominated by indies, including Indie Alliance members Granta, Portobello, Atlantic, and two from Faber, plus a non-fiction study of Nigeria from I B Tauris author Michael Peel"
    • the publishing industry is "still cautious about the fragile book market despite reports in the mainstream media that the recession is coming to an end. Footprint m.d. Andy Riddle said that despite sales holding up well, 'consumer confidence has clearly taken a big knock that will take some time to recover from'. He added that the market felt fragile and that he would be looking forward to the close of the year with 'cautious confidence'"
  • Bookseller redux banner

    Each Monday, here on Editor's Corner, I run through the latest issue of the Bookseller magazine and pick out the bits and pieces of book industry news that catch my eye.

    This quick round-up of book stuff is culled from the pages of last Friday's 21st August issue:

    • Amazon.co.uk "is to start charging publishers £500 for 'rejected deliveries' and could introduce a range of other charges, according to a leaked email"
    • the Booksellers and Publishers Associations "have pledged 'definitely' to progress with the Bookaholism idea first suggested at this year's Book Industry Conference"
    • Sainsbury's "has revealed plans to grow book sales by 30% this year to more and £35m, in a drive fuelled by off-shelf promotions, range titles, campaigns and children's books"
    • Public Lening Right "could be extended to include non-print books such as e-books and audiobooks, under proposals put forward in an industry-wide government consultation"
    • Alexander McCall Smith "will began another series of his Corduroy Mansions title in his Daily Telegraph on 21st September"
    • Racing Post Books "will re-issue a biography of the champion jockey Kieren Fallon in September, more than a year after Orion withdrew it from publication"
    • Profile "is to publish Alain de Botton's account of working as a writer-in-residence at Heathrow Airport next month"
    • university presses "have stressed the importance of editorial independence from their educational establishments following the controversy surrounding the book The Cartoons That Shook the World"
    • John Blake Publishing "has acquired an authorised biography of author Ian Rankin and his detective character Inspector Rebus"
    • HarperCollins "has brought 98 titles from its New Naturalists series back into print with a new print-on-demand service"
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