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  • Bookseller redux banner

    Each Monday, here on Editor's Corner, I run through the latest issue of the Bookseller magazine and pick out the bits and pieces of book industry news that catch my eye.

    This quick round-up of book stuff is mainly culled from the Bookseller magazine (Friday February 19th issue):

    • publishers "have rallied behind Publishing Scotland (PS), describing a Scottish government think-tank's recommendations of merging it with the Independent Publishers Guild (IPG) as 'absolute nonsense'"
    • the Diagram Prize shortlist has been announced -- see details here
    • Dominic Myers "Waterstone's new managing director, will give his first address to the book trade at this year's Book Industry Conference. [He will be part of] a panel delivering a state of the industry overview"
    • Lee Child and Joanne Harris "are among authors appearing at a Random House Transworld book festival, in what is believed to be the first such event run by a publisher"
    • the Google Settlement "will offer 'greater legal security' to UK pubishers if it is approved by US Courts, the Publishers Association has said"
    • adminstrators have admitted "it is unlikely that 12 Wesley Owen stores will find a buyer, with its parent company IBS-STL owing trade creditors almost £2.5m, according to the administrators' report"
    • members of the Irish union Siptu "have voted to back Irish bookseller Eason's proposals to defer bonuses for 2009"
    • Snowbooks "made a profit of more than £14,000 last financial year, down from £17,000 in 2008, despite turnover dropping by roughly 25%"
    • authors "including Michael Rosen, Jacqueline Wilson and Sharon Osbourne will be taking part in nationwide events to celebrate World Book Day on 4th March"
    • more than "100 jobs are on the line at Reader's Digest Association UK after it went into administration on Wednesday due to problems with pensions deficit"
  • Bookseller redux banner

    Each Monday, here on Editor's Corner, I run through the latest issue of the Bookseller magazine and pick out the bits and pieces of book industry news that catch my eye.

    This quick round-up of book stuff is mainly culled from the Bookseller magazine (Friday February 12th issue):

    • children's books, romantic fiction and crime/thrillers "have been the enduring staples of the nation's public library borrowing over the past decade... Prolific writer Jacqueline Wilson tops the league as the most borrowed author of the Noughties, clocking up over 16 million public library loans between 1999 and 2009..."
    • thriller writer James Patterson "was the UK's most borrowed author for the third year running in 2008-09..."
    • publishers "will offer a range of initiatives to independent booksellers including extra discounts, competitions, and seasonal events in a bid to keep the sector blooming after the demise of Borders..."
    • National Book Tokens "has announced it will introduce a new terminal on which its new electronic gift cards (EGC) can operate with any bank..."
    • publishing staff "are benefiting from a balmier climate in 2010 compared to last year's pay freezes, with recruitment agencies observing a 'most noticeable upturn' in salaries and hiring..."
    • Bertelsmann "has given up Italian bookselling interests, with the sale of its one-half stake in the Mondolibri book club and the bol.it online bookstore..."
    • Pan Macmillan "has reported a 7% growth of total sales across all markets to £66.6m for 2009 against 2008..."
    • Hachette USA "has become the latest publisher to back agency pricing following Macmillan US' row with Amazon. [CEO] David Young said the move, which gives the retailer a cut of sales with the publisher setting the price, would 'reflect the value of our authors' works' although it would make less money in the model..."
    • Penguin Group c.e.o. John Makinson has said "publishers need to 'keep a tight control of rights and a measure of authority over pricing' if they are to ride the tide of the digital revolution..."
    • Random House imprint "Harvill Secker will release limited editions of books by J M Coetzee, Haruki Murakami and Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa as part of its centenary celebrations..."
  • Bookseller redux banner

    Each Monday, here on Editor's Corner, I run through the latest issue of the Bookseller magazine and pick out the bits and pieces of book industry news that catch my eye.

    This quick round-up of book stuff is mainly culled from the Bookseller magazine (Friday February 5th issue):

    • the world's biggest publishers "look set to follow Macmillan US' lead in demanding changes to how Amazon sells and prices e-books, after what was described by one senior UK publishing executive as a 'very significant week and genuinely a very good week for book publishers, authors and readers... Apple's iPad is a big opportunity for the market to sell e-books at sensible prices to a growing market..."
    • Apple "will begin shipping the wi-fi models of the iPad from March with the 3G version following in April..."
    • independent numbers "dwindled last year with almost two shops closing a week a Booksellers Association figures revealing the biggest net closure since 2004..."
    • Book Tokens chairman Willie Anderson "has hit back at criticism by independent booksellers about the new electronic gift card (EGC)"
    • travel bookseller Stanfords is "looking to focus on 'customer lifestyle' in a bid to reverse falling profits and sales..."
    • BBC presenter "economist and journalist Evan Davies is to chair the BBC Samuel Johnson Prize for Non-Fiction as the £20,000 award reaches its 12th anniversary..."
    • Oxford University Press "has given its dictionaries a digital boost, offering individual customers and institutions an additional online package with any purchase from its 40-strong range..."
    • Random House "imprint Yellow Jersey has dominated this year's British Sports Book Awards picking up eight nominations..."
    • the government's stance "on the revised Google Settlement has been heavily criticised by authors, with novelist Nick Harkaway calling it 'a statement of crawling weakness'..."
    • HarperCollins UK "has increased profit during its second quarter although the recession has continued to hit sales..."
  • Bookseller redux banner

    Each Monday, here on Editor's Corner, I run through the latest issue of the Bookseller magazine and pick out the bits and pieces of book industry news that catch my eye.

    This quick round-up of book stuff is mainly culled from the Bookseller magazine (Friday January 29 issue):

    • JD Salinger had "15 new novels hidden in safe" -- more at mirror.co.uk
    • Penguin has Salinger backlist relaunch planned for June: "Penguin imprint Hamish Hamilton will be relaunching JD Salinger's backlist in June with new covers approved by Salinger himself. The rejacketing was planned before the reclusive author died on Wednesday at his home at the age of 91..."
    • Borders' UK crash leaves £40m unsecured debt: "Borders UK's unsecured creditors could receive as little as 1.5p in the £1, with just £600,000 ring-fenced to pay what is estimated to be in excess of £40m-worth of debt..."
    • Celeb memoirs 'here to stay': "Publishers believe the celebrity memoir is "here to stay" despite a poor performance last year, with new titles from Keith Richards, Michael Caine and Katie Price in the pipeline for 2010..."
    • Amazon.com 'temporarily' pulls titles from Macmillan US after e-book row: "Macmillan has set out new terms for the sale of e-books in the US, which has resulted in Amazon.com removing from direct sale all physical books and Kindle editons published by Macmillan..."
    • UK publishers hail the iBook moment: "Publishers have welcomed the launch of Apple's iPad as an "important step" in the transition towards digital books, with one branding it "the most significant development yet". Dan Franklin, digital editor at Canongate, said: "I sat there and thought 'this is what we've been waiting for'." John Makinson, chief executive at Penguin, said the announcement represented "an important step in the development of a digital audience for books"..."
    • However: Apple says iBook Store available in US only: "Apple's iBook Store looks unlikely to be made available outside of the US at launch, RegHardware is reporting..."
    • TV Book Club audience grows, but 'best read' sales dip: "'The TV Book Club' on More 4 and Channel 4 scooped a bigger audience this week, picking up a peak average audience just short of 500,000 viewers overall. However, total weekly sales of the 10 titles saw a slight drop after transmission of the first show..."
    • World Book Day targets adult readers: "Adult readers will be able to buy one paperback under £10 and get a second free to donate to charity or give as a gift as part of this year's World Book Day. Vouchers will be given away in the Times, Sunday Times, the Sun or News of the World between 4-7 March..."
    • Sales drop, but W H Smith says it had a 'good' Christmas: "W H Smith has described its Christmas performance, in which like-for-like high street sales were down 5% for the 11 weeks to 23rd January, as "good" and "in line with expectations", stressing that despite the sales fall "gross margins increased and costs were tightly controlled" in both divisions..."
  • Bookseller redux banner

    Each Monday, here on Editor's Corner, I run through the latest issue of the Bookseller magazine and pick out the bits and pieces of book industry news that catch my eye.

    This quick round-up of book stuff is mainly culled from the Bookseller magazine (Friday January 22 issue):

    • Hachette UK "has achieved its biggest ever market share, closing 2009 with 16.4% of the country's book sales, shrugging off a tough 12 months in which seven of the top 10 publishers saw sales decline"
    • the Independent Alliance "celebrated its own record for 2009, climbing above Pan Macmillan to become the fifth largest publisher in the country. While seven of the top 10 single publishers saw sales decline, the alliance -- comprising Faber, Canongate, Quercus, Icon, Walker, Profile and their respective imprints -- has continued to grow"
    • independent publisher Legend Press "is launching a new imprint entitled Legend Business, with the plan to build a 'wide-ranging, interactive and dynamic list of business titles'"
    • academic publishers "have said a surge in university applicants and jobseekers looking to retrain duruing the recession have led to a strong 2009"
    • independent booksellers "will be honoured at the inaugural Bookseller Industry Awards with five regional awards, which will feed into the overall award for Independent Bookseller of the Year"
    • publishers, authors and agents "are starkly divided on the revised Google Book Settlement, as its opt-out deadline of 28th January looms. The settlement allows US users to search more than seven million titles with an option to buy"
    • publishers "are expecting 2010 to be a 'tipping point' for e-books, as rumours of a possible launch for Apple's new multimedia device increase"
    • publishers "have welcomed proposals to cut charges claimed by 'no-won, no-fee' lawyers in successful libel cases, but warned this change alone would be just cosmetic." Simon Flynn, m.d. of Icon Books, said: "This is definitely good news, but it's not tackling fundamental issues"
    • Time Out founder and chairman Tony Elliott "is to put £3m into the company in an attempt to cover losses of the same amount made during 2008 and keep the company running as a 'going concern'"
    • Bertrams "had 'good trading' over the Christmas period... [parent company] Smith News sales increased by 52.1% from 19th September to 9th January. On a like for like basis, sales fell 2.1%, which Smith News said: 'compares favourably with the trends experienced in the preceding year and indicates an underlying improvement in the market'"
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