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  • Bookseller redux banner

    Each Monday, here on Editor's Corner, I quickly run through the latest issue of the Bookseller magazine and pick out the bits and pieces of book industry news that catch my eye.

    This quick round-up of book stuff is culled from the pages of last Friday's 24th April issue:

    • the "surprise announcement of Dan Brown's sequel to The Da Vinci Code has caused glee among retailers, with the new book (The Lost Symbol) rocketing up the pre-release charts"
    • the "mood of those" attending the London Book Fair this year "was that business could be turning a corner, perhaps sooner than expected"
    • the "managing director of British Bookshops and Sussex Stationers is conducting a strategic review of the business to see how it can best cope with the economic downturn"
    • Christopher Davis "is to publish a history of Dorling Kindersley, the illustrated publisher that is now owned by Penguin"
    • HarperCollins UK "has signed two new books with author Freya North, extending an existing deal"
    • books for teenagers "dominate this year's CILIP Carnegie Medal shortlist, with five of the seven shortlisted titles aimed at readers aged 12-plus"
    • Simon & Schuster "has reprinted 10,000 copies of Olive Kitteridge, after the collection won the Pulitzer Prize this week"
    • HarperCollins "has cancelled publication of the final book by J G Ballard, who died from a long illness last Sunday (19th April). Conversations, a book chronicling Ballard's discussions with his oncologist... had been due to be published in September"
    • J R R Tolkien "will move into the digital age as HarperCollins begins selling his Lord of the Rings series as enhanced e-books"
    • Penguin "has signed an agreement with Beijing-based technology company Apabi which will see its e-books distributed in China"
  • Bookseller redux banner

    Each Monday, here on Editor's Corner, I quickly run through the latest issue of the Bookseller magazine and pick out the bits and pieces of book industry news that catch my eye.

    This quick round-up of book stuff is culled from the pages of last Friday's 17th April issue:

    • Sainsbury's "has set an ambitious growth target of double-digit sales uplift across the chain over the next twelve months." The plans include "a ten per cent increase in space devoted to book sales"
    • falling consumer spend, "increasing prices and a decline in the quality of publishing have been causing a slump across hardback sales, retailers have claimed"
    • publishers "are reporting a strong European presence with full diaries in the run up to next week's London Book Fair"
    • Penguin "is to publish Vladimir Nabokov's unfinished final novel, The Original of Laura. Penguin Classics editor Alexis Kirschbaum bought the book, together with continuing rights to the Nabokov backlist, in a six-figure deal"
    • Harvill Secker "publishing director Geoff Mulligan is to leave his post. Vintage editorial director Liz Foley is to take over the reins"
    • Bloomsbury "has removed the recommended retail price from a number of backlist titles to enable it to increase prices of older books to deal with rising costs"
    • the Publishers Association "has warned that UK publishers who fail to respond to the US-based Google Settlement will still be bound by the agreement but will not receive compensation for those books already digitised by the giant search engine"
    • a "French employee has been blamed for the 'data error' that caused 50,000 books on Amazon.com to be reclassified as 'adult' over the weekend"
    • library campaigners "have hit out after the Museums, Libraries and Archives Council (MLA) issued a confidential critique of a cost-cutting report compiled for Swindon Council"
    • Publishing Techology "is to launch a new e-book selling service that enables publishers to sell their own e-books or highlights of titles and chapters online"
  • Bookseller redux banner

    Each Monday, here on Editor's Corner, I quickly run through the latest issue of the Bookseller magazine and pick out the bits and pieces of book industry news that catch my eye.

    This quick round-up of book stuff is culled from the pages of last Friday's 10th April issue:

    • English PEN "has said it is 'startled by the extent' to which the UK's libel laws are now preventing publishers and journalists from releasing contentious material
    • Stanford's new managing director "will launch a strategic review of the travel retailer after the business raised 'hundreds of thousands' of pounds in a rights issue"
    • thirty-three jobs "have gone at Random House after the consultation process to reduce its workforce concluded"
    • library campaigners "have welcomed culture secretary Andy Burnham's decision to intervene in the public dispute about proposed library closures in the Wirral"
    • Time Out chair Tony Elliott "is 'still outraged' about the BBC's purchase of Lonely Planet and is disappointed that MPs have not recommended a forced sale"
    • Bloomsbury "is producing simultaneous print and e-book editions for all titles including those by A & C Black"
    • Headline Review's Jane Morpeth "has acquired a 'long-awaited' novel by award-winning author Andrea Levy for a six-figure sum through agent David Grossman"
    • a search "for a 'people's author' is due to launch on 'The Alan Titchmarsh Show' on ITV1 in conjunction with the Orion Publishing Group
    • Oneworld Publications "is launching a fiction list after more than 20 years dedicated solely to non-fiction... It launches this summer with the hardback release of The Book of the Night Women by Jamaican author Marlon James
    • bookings for stands "at this year's London Book Fair are down 2% compared to this time in 2008"
  • Bookseller redux banner

    Each Monday, here on Editor's Corner, I quickly run through the latest issue of the Bookseller magazine and pick out the bits and pieces of book industry news that catch my eye.

    This quick round-up of book stuff is culled from the pages of last Friday's 3rd April issue:

    • the Booksellers Association and Publishers Association "are working on a cross-industry campaign to promote the value of reading." The move is in response to a report saying "that the proportion of people buying books has fallen over the past five years to 57%"
    • independents and chains "could most be at risk from the economic downturn, as customers are increasingly shopping around for better prices"
    • Transworld publisher "Bill Scott-Kerr is beefing up some big brands, after signing up former SAS man Andy McNab for seven new books, and five by hypnotist Paul McKenna"
    • retail chain Hughes & Hughes "said it was to start selling the Sony e-book reader in Ireland"
    • Laura Beatty "has won the £1,000 Authors' Club First Novel Award for Pollard
    • Bloomsbury's "share price dropped more than 11% on the day the publisher reported its 2008 results, with chief executive Nigel Newton expressing caution about prospects for the year ahead"
    • the Booksellers Association "has welcomed news that the government is to ditch plans that were due to come into force this month to hike the uniform business rate by 5%
    • Virgin "has bought what is billed as the first insider account of US President Barack Obama's rise to power. Renegade: The Making of Barack Obama is written by by British journalist Richard Wolffe"
    • book sales in the US fell by 2.8% last year
    • a "survey by the British Printing Industries Federation (BPIF) has reported that between December and February the general state of trade in the printing industry was the worst for 18 years"

     

  • Bookseller redux banner

    Each Monday, here on Editor's Corner, I quickly run through the latest issue of the Bookseller magazine and pick out the bits and pieces of book industry news that catch my eye.

    This quick round-up of book stuff is culled from the pages of last Friday's 27th March issue:

    • Bertrams Group "is aiming to win more business among online and high street retailers, and libraries, as well as continuing its 'strong' relationship with indies"
    • distributors have begun "collecting books from collapsed wholesaler Entertainment UK, after the Publishers Association and administrators Deloitte reached an agreement over ownership of stock"
    • the Publishers Association "has said its analysis of publishers' sales data shows 'Christmas happened -- sort of' after a small decline in the fourth quarter left the market down by 2% in the UK in 2008, but only by 0.2% once export sales are included"
    • several parties "have expressed an interest in taking over the two bookshops owned by ArgentVive, which went into administration [last] Monday"
    • Orion Children's Books "has acquired world rights for further Horrid Henry books in a deal secured by Fiona Kennedy"
    • sales at Random House's worldwide businesses "remained 'stable' in 2008, but profit dropped more than 20% amid what its parent Bertelsmann called 'declining consumer confidence and flat book markets'"
    • the credit crunch "is forcing a more focused approach at the Bologna Book Fair, with a number of notable absences from this year's event"
    • publishers, retailers and librarians "are missing out on a potential market of 20 million consumers because the book world is too intimidating." Research "looked at attitudes to books in the C2DE socio-economic group... It found that in many such families books are seen as alien and unattractive"
    • Michael Joseph fiction publisher Mari Evans "has bought world rights in a first novel about relationships and starting over by thrice-married TV presenter Ulrika Jonsson"
    • Scottish publisher "Mainstream is returning to fiction 'after many years', with the launch of three novels and a collection of short stories this year"
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