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  • Bookseller redux banner

    Each Monday, here on Editor's Corner, I run through the latest issue of the Bookseller magazine and pick out the bits and pieces of book industry news that catch my eye.

    This quick round-up of book stuff is mainly culled from the Bookseller website:

    • Crocheting Adventures with Hyperbolic Planes by Daina Taimina has won the Diagram Prize for Oddest Title of the Year
    • BA uneasy over library e-book proposals: "The Booksellers Association is meeting its council members after expressing concerns over the government's long-awaited library review proposed a ban on the sector charging for e-books..."
    • Myers plans to 'rejuvenate' Waterstone's after 'stifling homogeneity': "Waterstone's is looking at a "rejuvenation" of its brand to reflect the changes made to its range under the retailer's new management team..."
    • Amazon demands price parity for marketplace: "Amazon.co.uk is bringing in new rules to ensure Marketplace sellers are offering their goods at the same price or lower than on other "non-physical sales channels". From 31st March, Amazon said it would require "price parity from all sellers", meaning no website - including ebay - or catalogue, third party platform or mobile applications, can undercut the e-tailer. It is giving participants until 1st May to get everything in order..."
    • Book trade prepares for busy LBF: "Publishers and agents have said they are expecting to have an "incredibly busy" London Book Fair with no notable absences and schedules already jam-packed..."
    • Bookshop numbers flat in early 2010: "Bookshops are 'holding their own' in a tough climate, after new figures revealed the number of bookshops remained flat for the first three months of the year..."
    • Bologna embraces the "middle grade": "Books in the eight to 12 age range, known by the American term "middle grade", are in hot demand at the Bologna Book Fair as international publishers look to fill the gap left by the recent emphasis on teen fiction..."
    • Canongate snaps up werewolf trilogy; Transworld signs Cheryl Cole: "Canongate has acquired a trilogy of werewolf thriller novels by Glen Duncan in a pre-emptive deal. Francis Bickmore, acquiring editor at Canongate, bought world rights (excluding North America) for an undisclosed sum from Jonny Geller at Curtis Brown..." And "Transworld has bought the rights to the first official Cheryl Cole book, My World, to be published on 30th September. Editorial director Sarah Emsley bought world rights from literary agent Pat Lomax at Bell Lomax Moreton..."
  • Bookseller redux banner

    Each Monday, here on Editor's Corner, I run through the latest issue of the Bookseller magazine and pick out the bits and pieces of book industry news that catch my eye.

    This quick round-up of book stuff is mainly culled from the Bookseller website:

    • Critics pounce on Library Review: "The newly-published Library Modernisation Review has attracted criticism from shadow culture minister Ed Vaizey as well as from library campaigner Tim Coates, despite being welcomed by the Chartered Institute for Library and Information Professionals (CILIP)..."
    • IPG: Publishers face 'Copernican shift' from digital: "Digital was to the fore at this year's Independent Publishers Guild conference, with discussions ranging from having the right metadata to working with the games industry..."
    • Earthscan makes it a hat-trick at IPA: "Earthscan scored a treble at this year's Independent Publishers Award, picking up three of the gongs including the top prize, the Independent Publisher of the Year..."
    • Former Reed Elsevier chief gets £2.2m sign-off: "Former Reed Elsevier chief executive Ian Smith was paid £2.2m over the 10 months he was with the group, according to its annual report and accounts. The figure included £733,000 for losing his job, a £428,000 bonus, £233,000 paid in lieu of pension, and £42,000 for holiday not taken. Smith left the company "by mutual consent" in November..."
    • Bargains a hit in high street squeeze: "Chain bookshops and book clubs were the biggest retail losers in 2009, with value and volume sales declining, according to data by Book Marketing Limited..."
    • Paper book tokens to run dry this May: "National Book Tokens has confirmed it plans to stop supplying paper tokens to booksellers from 31st May this year..."
    • Trade raises concerns over licensing in digital bill: "Writers and agents have raised concerns over the provisions on collective licensing contained in the Digital Economy Bill, which went through the House of Lords this week, and is now expected to be passed ahead of the election through a procedure known as 'wash up'..."
    • Osprey launches "freemium" app: "Military press Osprey Publishing, which picked up the Consumer Publishing award at this weekend's IPG Awards, has made five history books available as "freemium" apps via the Apple e-commerce store..."
    • Row erupts in France over book association head: "A major row has erupted over the appointment of a new president of the French Publishers Association just a few days before the troubled Paris Book Fair opens on Friday..."
    • Simon Juden quits Publishers Association for Pearson: "Simon Juden has resigned from the Publishers Association, and will take up the role of head of public policy at Pearson later this year. Juden, who has been chief executive of the PA for the last three years, will stay on at the trade body until a replacement has been found..."
  • Bookseller redux banner

    Each Monday, here on Editor's Corner, I run through the latest issue of the Bookseller magazine and pick out the bits and pieces of book industry news that catch my eye.

    This quick round-up of book stuff is mainly culled from the Bookseller website:

    • Abu Dhabi fair looks to increase attendance: "Organisers of the Abu Dhabi International Book Fair (ADIBF) are planning additional professional programmes and enticements to attract more international publishers to future fairs..."
    • Agents and publishers grapple over 'enhanced' e-book rights: "Enhanced e-books, which offer multimedia content such as video, are emerging as a new right in the marketplace, with publishers and agents tussling over who should own them..."
    • Deal agreed over Watkins Books: "Watkins Books has been saved by American entrepreneur, Etan Ilfeld, just two weeks before the business was due to be liquidated..."
    • Books etc website to relaunch 'next week': "The Books etc website, which went offline days after its launch last month, is due to go back online next week. A note on its website said the site would be running again during the week commencing 15th March..."
    • Conference concern over campus booksellers: "Publishers and retailers should work together against excess discounting, in a bid to improve the perceived value of books, delegates at this week's ASP (academic, professional and specialist booksellers) conference heard..."
    • Hachette's profit up 24% in 2009, US arm races ahead of UK: "Hachette made a profit of €301m in 2009, up 24% on 2008, according to full-year figures released by its French parent Lagardere. But the figures also revealed that Hachette's UK and Australian businesses' share of group sales fell from 21% in 2008 to 19% in 2009, with sales from the US wing now making up 25% of turnover. The group added that Hachette US' digital sales were 3% of full-year sales in the US, €17m..."
    • Barnsley hails World Book Day 'boost': "World Book Day has 'given a great boost to the market', its chair Victoria Barnsley has said. Her view was backed by booksellers spoken to by The Bookseller with many saying there had been an uplift in customers thanks to the annual promotion..."
    • Academic publishers seeing strong growth from e-book sales: "Nearly 90% of commmercial academic publishers have seen growth in e-book sales over the past two years, according to a cross-sector survey released today (10th March) by the Association of Learned Professional and Scholarly Publishers. Growth in some cases was more than 1,000%, with e-book sales now almost 10% of total book sales of the publishers surveyed..."
  • Bookseller redux banner

    Each Monday, here on Editor's Corner, I run through the latest issue of the Bookseller magazine and pick out the bits and pieces of book industry news that catch my eye.

    This quick round-up of book stuff is mainly culled from the Bookseller magazine (Friday March 5th issue):

    • UK literary agents and authors "have been approached directly to sell e-books to Amazon"
    • Foyles "has become the first high street retailer to sell a wireless e-book reader with the launch of the BoBook Neo"
    • Irish book chain "Hughes & Hughes collapsed because of 'unprecedented conditions' in retail, according to the chairman of the Irish Booksellers Association"
    • National Book Tokens "has sold 48,000 new electronic gift cards in its first month in operation, deeming the launch a 'trade-wide success'"
    • The Penguin Group "passed the £1bn sales mark in 2009, but the cost of the Penguin UK and Dorling Kindersley restructures meant a 10% hit in operating profit"
    • Wholesaler Gardners "is offering the winner of this year's Independent Bookseller of the Year award a prize of £5,000"
    • the administrators of the "Reader's Digest Association Limited (RDA) said there was 'significant interest' from potential buyers"
    • traditional booksellers "have had a frosty start to the year as shoppers stayed at home to avoid icy weather, with sales in Scotland bearing the brunt of the coldest winter for 30 years"
    • travel publishers "are optimistic the sector could bounce back in 2010, after travel industry association reported a 27% increase in bookings at the start of February compared to 2009"
    • "Faber, Quercus, Canongate and Allison & Busby have joined Bloomsbury's digital library initiative"
  • Bookseller redux banner

    Each Monday, here on Editor's Corner, I run through the latest issue of the Bookseller magazine and pick out the bits and pieces of book industry news that catch my eye.

    This quick round-up of book stuff is mainly culled from the Bookseller magazine (Friday February 26th issue):

    • the best hope "for the beleagured travel market is for it to 'plateau out', as sales slumped by almost 90%" However...
    • ... "travel publishers and booksellers will try to recapture travellers' interest and improve travel sales with enhanced digital content, consumer research and events"
    • the new-look Bookseller Industry Awards, "formed by the merger of The Bookseller's Retail Awards with the British Book Industry Awards, a.k.a. the Trade Nibbies, are launched this week"
    • Gardners "is launching an 'Indie Bookshop Recommends' range for book clubs and has offered to match publisher discounts to indies, as part of a new promotion"
    • Viking "has twiced increased the print run of Andrew Rawnsley's The End of the Party... Allegations from the book, including that Gordon Brown bullied staff, have dominated the headlines"
    • The Libel Reform Campaign "led by English PEN, Index on Censorship and Sense Against Science, has welcomed a report on libel law issued this week (24th February) by a cross-party group of MPs"
    • resistance "among authors to the revised Google Book Settlement stiffened this week with the launch of a campaign group to militate against the erosion of copyright"
    • Oneworld Classics "is launching a new imprint that focusses on 'some of the best classics' published by John Calder, as well as newly-commissioned works from world literature"
    • illustrated publisher "Octopus has acquired the UK publishing arm of Australian Women's Weekly"
    • Thursday, 4th March, is World Book Day
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