Book Depository Blog

RSS

 

  • 20 years of Mandela's freedom

    Thu, 11 Feb 2010 12:25

    | |

    A momentous anniversary for South Africa -- and, indeed, the world. Today, chanting "Viva, Nelson Mandela, Viva," thousands of South Africans marked 20 years since the anti-apartheid icon walked to freedom after 27 years as a political prisoner:

    Now a frail 91-year-old, Mandela did not attend the celebrations at the Drakenstein Prison near Cape Town, although a huge bronze statue of him marching from jail, fist pumping the air, towered over the crowd much as Mandela's image towers over South African politics and society to this day.

    Among the predominantly black crowd of well-wishers waving the black, green and gold flags of Mandela's African National Congress (ANC) were fellow "struggle" heroes present on that momentous Sunday two decades ago (more...)

  • | |

    A momentous anniversary for South Africa -- and, indeed, the world. Today, chanting "Viva, Nelson Mandela, Viva," thousands of South Africans marked 20 years since the anti-apartheid icon walked to freedom after 27 years as a political prisoner:

    Now a frail 91-year-old, Mandela did not attend the celebrations at the Drakenstein Prison near Cape Town, although a huge bronze statue of him marching from jail, fist pumping the air, towered over the crowd much as Mandela's image towers over South African politics and society to this day.

    Among the predominantly black crowd of well-wishers waving the black, green and gold flags of Mandela's African National Congress (ANC) were fellow "struggle" heroes present on that momentous Sunday two decades ago (more...)

  • Martin Luther King Day

    Mon, 18 Jan 2010 09:42

    | |

    Today, as you'll know, is Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. Ronald Reagan signed the holiday into law in 1983, but it was only officially observed in all 50 states for the first time in 2000. Today, as much as ever, we need to hear and understand King's message and respond fully to it...

    See all our great Martin Luther King books here.

  • Keyes tops the charts

    Thu, 14 Jan 2010 10:06

    |

    The 100 bestselling paperbacks published in 2009 accounted for 7.6% of all book sales last year, and took just over £84m through UK book retailer tills, according to Nielsen BookScan data. But this was down on last year's figures when the "hot 100" brought in sales of £97.5m. The Bookseller has the details:

    Fiction was the dominant genre accounting for 77 titles and generating revenue of £69.9m, down from £78,8m last year. Non-fiction generated sales of £11.3m (£15.5m in 2008), while children's paperbacks brought in £2.9m (£3.2m in 2008).

    Marian Keyes was the number one with a 490,770 sale for This Charming Man (Penguin) in 2009. In 2008, Lindwood Barclay topped the list with No Time for Goodbye, which sold a massive 643,225 copies that year.

    Total paperback sales last year (not just those published in 2009) were down just 0.1% on 2008, but despite the stalwart sales for works by some of the biggest brands in fiction, and some fantastic sales for relative newbies, there was a 2.3% decline in paperback fiction sales, which was undoubtedly due to the decline in influence of Richard & Judy. If you were to strip out R&J's influence from the 2008 and 2009 pb figures, then paperback sales last year would be up around half a percent. Eight of R&J's 2009 recommendations make the hot 100, down from 11 in 2008's comparative list, while sales of R&J's recommended titles fell by 50% year on year (more...)

  • Tolstoy's centenary year

    Wed, 06 Jan 2010 10:02

    | |

    To mark the centenary of Russian author Leo Tolstoy's death, the Guardian has published a series of articles on one of the finest writers to have ever lived (expect this to be a big year for all things Tolstoy-related). Particularly noteworthy is Jay Parini's article There's more to Tolstoy than War and Peace:

    This is the anniversary year for Tolstoy's death -- a century ago he fled his ancestral home, Yasnaya Polyana, and went on the road with a friend (his private doctor) to become a kind of wandering monk. He died only a couple of weeks later, in a remote railway station called Astapovo. He was estranged from his wife of nearly five decades, cut off from all of his children except one daughter, who had become a devoted "Tolstoyan". It was a strange end, and the story itself was (to me) so compelling that I wrote a novel about it, The Last Station, in 1990. It has now been made into a film, with Helen Mirren as the Countess and Christopher Plummer as the great man himself.

    Needless to say, the anniversary is going to draw a lot of readers to Tolstoy. This is certainly a good thing. I would assume that most readers who have read Tolstoy seriously will know the important novels, War and Peace and Anna Karenina. These are certainly masterpieces that rank among the great works of western European literature. I go back to them myself every few years, just to sink into their worlds, which are endlessly informative, stimulating, and convincing. I love these books.

    But there is a vast shelf of books by Leo Tolstoy, and these contain some very intriguing and much less widely read works (more...)

  • Showing 11 to 15 of 311 results < Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next >
  • Can't find what you're looking for? Try our below.

Book Depository Team
Publisher Blogs