Christmas Posting Dates

Book Depository Blog

RSS

 

  • Justin McNeil reviews Steven Moore's The Novel: An Alternative History, Beginnings to 1600 over at bombsite:

    Critics are the private detectives of the book world. They're out there right now -- reading with red-rimmed eyes and waiting for the next playful transgressor to arrive -- like say, George Perec, who tried to slip a whole book by without using the letter "e." Enter book-detective Steven Moore, Moore is like the detective with every crime in a file and a soft spot for the outre, the ludicrous, the lusty, and the unique. This new book is Moore giving us a peek at his dossier of notes and the vast terrain of his musings on the origins of the novel.

    The Novel: An Alternative History, Beginnings to 1600 is the first part of Moore's complete history of the prose narrative. Think of it as B.D.Q., or Before Don Quixote. It represents everything Moore could cram into a book up to 1600, which is traditionally the point at which critics place the novel's beginnings. Moore's task encompasses the literature of the Greek, Hebrew, Latin, Sanskrit, Chinese, Old French, and Icelandic- speaking worlds, among others. Before we go too far into the shadow of history, note that Moore is a confessed lover of 20th century fiction, so what might be seen as antique by another is surveyed here with a hyper-modern eye (more...)

  • Justin McNeil reviews Steven Moore's The Novel: An Alternative History, Beginnings to 1600 over at bombsite:

    Critics are the private detectives of the book world. They're out there right now -- reading with red-rimmed eyes and waiting for the next playful transgressor to arrive -- like say, George Perec, who tried to slip a whole book by without using the letter "e." Enter book-detective Steven Moore, Moore is like the detective with every crime in a file and a soft spot for the outre, the ludicrous, the lusty, and the unique. This new book is Moore giving us a peek at his dossier of notes and the vast terrain of his musings on the origins of the novel.

    The Novel: an Alternative History, Beginnings to 1600 is the first part of Moore's complete history of the prose narrative. Think of it as B.D.Q., or Before Don Quixote. It represents everything Moore could cram into a book up to 1600, which is traditionally the point at which critics place the novel's beginnings. Moore's task encompasses the literature of the Greek, Hebrew, Latin, Sanskrit, Chinese, Old French, and Icelandic- speaking worlds, among others. Before we go too far into the shadow of history, note that Moore is a confessed lover of 20th century fiction, so what might be seen as antique by another is surveyed here with a hyper-modern eye (more...)

  • Ben Macintyre -- author of Agent Zigzag: A True Story of Nazi Espionage, Love, and Betrayal -- is back with the "utterly thrilling" Operation Mincemeat: How a Dead Man and a Bizarre Plan Fooled the Nazis and Assured an Allied Victory. Reviewed today in the New York Times:

    Excellent westerns have been composed by people who could barely ride a horse, and the best writers of sex scenes are often novelists you wouldn't wish to see naked. But when it comes to spy fiction, life and art tend to collide fully: nearly all of the genre's greatest practitioners worked in intelligence before signing their first book contract.

    "W. Somerset Maugham, John Buchan, Ian Fleming, Graham Greene, John le Carre: all had experienced the world of espionage firsthand," Ben Macintyre writes in his new book, Operation Mincemeat. "For the task of the spy is not so very different from that of the novelist: to create an imaginary, credible world and then lure others into it by words and artifice." Both are lurkers, confounders, ironists, betrayers: in a word, they're spooks.

    Mr. Macintyre himself writes about spies so craftily, and so ebulliently, that you half suspect him of being some type of spook himself. It is apparently not so. He is a benign-seeming writer at large and associate editor at The Times of London, a father of three and the author of five previous, respected nonfiction books, including Agent Zigzag: A True Story of Nazi Espionage, Love, and Betrayal (2007). Perhaps he is also controlling predator drones and a flock of assassins from a basement compound. But, alas, I doubt it.

    Operation Mincemeat is utterly, to employ a dead word, thrilling. But to call it thus is to miss the point slightly, in terms of admiring it properly. Mr. Macintyre has got his hands around a true story that's so wind-swept, so weighty and so implausible that the staff of a college newspaper, high on glue sticks, could surely take its basic ingredients and not completely muck things up (more...)

  • Almost as a counterpoint to the book I recommended on Friday (Claus Hant's Young Hitler), here is a new book about Hitler which reveals previously unknown information about the founder of the Thule Society:

    In a new book about Hitler, historian Aytun Altindal dedicates a whole section to the mysterious Baron Rudolf von Sebottendorf, the founder of the Thule Society, which Hitler joined in 1919 and later transformed into the National Socialist German Workers' Party.

    Behind the Mask of Hitler by Aytun Altindal is published on the 21st May.

    In the first section of the book, notorious for his controversial content, the author gives a detailed study of the dictator's family life, and offers enlightening information into a questionable lineage that Hitler was determined to keep secret.

    He goes on to study Hitler's fascination of the occult and the way the Thule Society nurtured his ideologies and cultural pessimism.

    Whereas most historians record the Baron Rudolf von Sebottendorf as either having died in 1933 during the 'Night of the Knives', or having committed suicide in 1945, Altindal claims there are police documents showing that he was still alive in 1957 and living in Turkey.

    The author Aytun Altindal is a political analyst and an expert on comparative religions and secret societies. He is recognised for his outstanding work, his opposition to oppressive military regimes and his dedication to human rights issues, such as women's liberation and secularism. He has written twenty-three books -- seven of which were banned in his home country of Turkey for their politically controversial content and he was sentenced to prison.

  • Are you a DF!? Steve Almond is...

    Steve Almond does not question whether rock 'n' roll can save your life; he outright proclaims in his new book that it will. There's one catch: You have to be what Almond has dubbed a DF, drooling fanatic, one who devotes way too much time to listening to and obsessing over music.

    Since the Boston writer is an admitted DF, "Rock and Roll Will Save Your Life" is as much memoir as it is discussion about music as emotional, spiritual, and psychological balm. And as pilgrims go, Almond is a pretty funny seeker.

    Almond traces his obsession to his boyhood and stuffs self-deprecating wit into his tales about developing musical tastes by trying to follow an older brother's lead or making his teachers suffer through piano lessons. Yet, after describing how intently he and a middle-school buddy listened daily to an AC/DC record, Almond pauses the laugh track to make the observation, "Drooling Fanaticism boils down to undivided attention, which is not only our most endangered human resource, but the first and final act of love." (More via the Boston Times...)

  • Showing 1 to 5 of 52 results < Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next >
  • Can't find what you're looking for? Try our below.

Book Depository Team
Publisher Blogs