Book Depository Blog

RSS

 

  • The Pulitzer Prize winners...

    Wed, 14 Apr 2010 04:36

    The Pulitzer Prize winners have been announced (go to pulitzer.org for the full break down):


    Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction: Tinkers by Paul Harding: "An old man lies dying. Confined to bed in his living room, he sees the walls around him begin to collapse, the windows come loose from their sashes, and the ceiling plaster fall off in great chunks, showering him with a lifetime of debris: newspaper clippings, old photographs, wool jackets, rusty tools, and the mangled brass works of antique clocks..."


    Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry: Versed by Rae Armantrout: "The poems in the first section, 'Versed', play with vice and versa, the perversity of human consciousness. They flirt with error and delusion, skating on a thin ice that inevitably cracks. In the second section, 'Dark Matter', the invisible and unknowable are confronted directly as Armantrout's experience with cancer marks these poems with a new austerity, shot through with her signature wit and stark unsentimental thinking..."


    Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Biography: The First Tycoon - The Epic Life of Cornelius Vanderbilt by T.J. Stiles: "Founder of a dynasty, builder of the original Grand Central, creator of an impossibly vast fortune, Cornelius 'Commodore' Vanderbilt is an American icon. Humbly born on Staten Island during George Washington's presidency, he rose from boatman to builder of the nation's largest fleet of steamships to lord of a railroad empire...


    Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Non-Fiction: The Dead Hand - The Untold Story of the Cold War Arms Race and Its Dangerous Legacy by David E Hoffman: "During the Cold War, world superpowers amassed nuclear arsenals containing the explosive power of one million Hiroshimas. The Soviet Union secretly plotted to create the "Dead Hand," a system designed to launch an automatic retaliatory nuclear strike on the United States, and developed a fearsome biological warfare machine. President Ronald Reagan, hoping to awe the Soviets into submission, pushed hard for the creation of space-based missile defenses..."


    Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for History: Lords of Finance: The Bankers Who Broke the World by Liaquat Ahamed: "With penetrating insights for today, this vital history of the world economic collapse of the late 1920s offers unforgettable portraits of the four men whose personal and professional actions as heads of their respective central banks changed the course of the twentieth century..."

  • Pulitzer Prize winners announced

    Wed, 14 Apr 2010 04:19

    The Pulitzer Prize winners have been announced (go to pulitzer.org for the full break down):


    Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction: Tinkers by Paul Harding: "An old man lies dying. Confined to bed in his living room, he sees the walls around him begin to collapse, the windows come loose from their sashes, and the ceiling plaster fall off in great chunks, showering him with a lifetime of debris: newspaper clippings, old photographs, wool jackets, rusty tools, and the mangled brass works of antique clocks..."


    Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry: Versed by Rae Armantrout: "The poems in the first section, 'Versed', play with vice and versa, the perversity of human consciousness. They flirt with error and delusion, skating on a thin ice that inevitably cracks. In the second section, 'Dark Matter', the invisible and unknowable are confronted directly as Armantrout's experience with cancer marks these poems with a new austerity, shot through with her signature wit and stark unsentimental thinking..."


    Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Biography: The First Tycoon - The Epic Life of Cornelius Vanderbilt by T.J. Stiles: "Founder of a dynasty, builder of the original Grand Central, creator of an impossibly vast fortune, Cornelius 'Commodore' Vanderbilt is an American icon. Humbly born on Staten Island during George Washington's presidency, he rose from boatman to builder of the nation's largest fleet of steamships to lord of a railroad empire...


    Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Non-Fiction: The Dead Hand - The Untold Story of the Cold War Arms Race and Its Dangerous Legacy by David E Hoffman: "During the Cold War, world superpowers amassed nuclear arsenals containing the explosive power of one million Hiroshimas. The Soviet Union secretly plotted to create the "Dead Hand," a system designed to launch an automatic retaliatory nuclear strike on the United States, and developed a fearsome biological warfare machine. President Ronald Reagan, hoping to awe the Soviets into submission, pushed hard for the creation of space-based missile defenses..."


    Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for History: Lords of Finance: The Bankers Who Broke the World by Liaquat Ahamed: "With penetrating insights for today, this vital history of the world economic collapse of the late 1920s offers unforgettable portraits of the four men whose personal and professional actions as heads of their respective central banks changed the course of the twentieth century..."

  • | |

    Three great recent foodbooks (Foer's Eating Animals, Kessler's The End of Overeating and Standage's An Edible History of Humanity) reviewed in the Financial Times:

    Suppose that you and your partner go out for dinner tonight. You order steak and salad while your partner has chicken with rice. Now inspect your plates. Your cow spent almost all its life in a shed, burping methane that heats the planet. It was then slaughtered, often incompetently: it may have been still alive when its head was skinned and its legs cut off. Your "salad", doused in dressing, is really "fat with a little lettuce".

    Your partner's chicken lived for six weeks, diseased and crammed so closely with other birds that it cracked several bones. After torture, came slaughter: the bird was shoved into a truck, taken to the slaughterhouse, and shackled upside down. It died screaming and excreting on itself in terror. The rice comes from plants bred by scientists in the 1960s. Both your meals are lathered in the extra fat, sugar, salt and chemicals to which you have become addicted. Enjoy your meal.

    Three sterling books by Jonathan Safran Foer, David Kessler and Tom Standage examine a new era in food. Until about 20 years ago, people mostly thought about how to obtain food. Then, in rich countries, they began thinking about how to enjoy it more. Cookery and diet books invaded the bestseller lists. Now people are increasingly wondering whether they should enjoy today

  • Russia Against Napoleon

    Tue, 13 Apr 2010 09:09

    Nice review in the New York Times of Dominic Lieven Russia Against Napoleon: The True Story of the Campaigns of War and Peace:

    "War," Thomas Hardy once wrote, "makes rattling good history." If you would like an example of exactly what Hardy meant, I commend Russia Against Napoleon by Dominic Lieven.

    Never in history, perhaps, did a man of such extraordinary military genius suffer so extraordinary a military disaster. On June 24, 1812, Napoleon Bonaparte, the master of continental Europe, led nearly half a million men into the depths of Russia to enforce his will upon Czar Alexander I. With greatly inferior forces, Russia could not afford to confront Napoleon head on. Instead, the Russian commander, Mikhail Kutuzov, of necessity adopted Fabian tactics, harassing the invaders but avoiding pitched battle when possible.

    The one really big battle, Borodino, was more or less a draw, after Napoleon gave up personal command for reasons never satisfactorily explained. On Sept. 14 Moscow fell to Napoleon, and he sent peace overtures to Alexander, thinking the czar had no option but to negotiate.

    The Russians stalled and hinted but never gave a firm answer, seeking to keep Napoleon in Moscow as long as possible. On Oct. 19, with the czar still dawdling, French food supplies dwindling rapidly, and the Russian winter closing in, Napoleon had no choice but to begin withdrawal. The weather, disease and constant Russian harassment then destroyed his Grande Armee. He started the invasion with 450,000 men; 6,000 returned home.

  • The Devil's Casino

    Thu, 08 Apr 2010 01:03

  • Showing 36 to 40 of 1533 results < Previous 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Next >
  • Can't find what you're looking for? Try our below.

Book Depository Team
Publisher Blogs