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    The World Until Yesterday: What Can We Learn from Traditional Societies? (Hardback) By (author) Jared M Diamond

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    DescriptionMost of us take for granted the features of our modern society, from air travel and telecommunications to literacy and obesity. Yet for nearly all of its six million years of existence, human society had none of these things. While the gulf that divides us from our primitive ancestors may seem unbridgeably wide, we can glimpse much of our former lifestyle in those largely traditional societies still or recently in existence. Societies like those of the New Guinea Highlanders remind us that it was only yesterday--in evolutionary time--when everything changed and that we moderns still possess bodies and social practices often better adapted to traditional than to modern conditions. "The World Until Yesterday" provides a mesmerizing firsthand picture of the human past as it had been for millions of years--a past that has mostly vanished--and considers what the differences between that past and our present mean for our lives today. This is Jared Diamond's most personal book to date, as he draws extensively from his decades of field work in the Pacific islands, as well as evidence from Inuit, Amazonian Indians, Kalahari San people, and others. Diamond doesn't romanticize traditional societies--after all, we are shocked by some of their practices--but he finds that their solutions to universal human problems such as child rearing, elder care, dispute resolution, risk, and physical fitness have much to teach us. A characteristically provocative, enlightening, and entertaining book, "The World Until Yesterday" will be essential and delightful reading.


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  • Full bibliographic data for The World Until Yesterday

    Title
    The World Until Yesterday
    Subtitle
    What Can We Learn from Traditional Societies?
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Jared M Diamond
    Physical properties
    Format: Hardback
    Number of pages: 512
    Width: 167 mm
    Height: 242 mm
    Thickness: 40 mm
    Weight: 853 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780670024810
    ISBN 10: 0670024813
    Classifications

    B&T Merchandise Category: GEN
    B&T Book Type: NF
    BIC subject category V2: HBG
    BIC E4L: HIS
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: T5.0
    BIC subject category V2: JHMC
    B&T Modifier: Region of Publication: 01
    B&T Modifier: Academic Level: 05
    B&T Modifier: Subject Development: 01
    Libri: I-HP
    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 15590
    BISAC V2.8: HIS037000
    Ingram Subject Code: HP
    B&T General Subject: 431
    BIC subject category V2: HBLA1
    BISAC V2.8: HIS053000
    B&T Approval Code: A33200000
    B&T Modifier: Geographic Designator: 11
    B&T Approval Code: A15700000
    BISAC V2.8: SOC002010
    DC22: 305.89/912, 305.89912
    LC subject heading: ,
    DC21: 305.89912
    LC subject heading: ,
    BISAC V2.8: HIS039000
    LC subject heading: , , , , ,
    LC classification: DU744.35.D32 D53 2012
    BISAC region code: 6.2.3.0.0.0.0
    Ingram Theme: ASPT/ANTHAS
    Thema V1.0: JHMC, NHB, NHTB
    Edition
    1
    Edition statement
    New ed.
    Publisher
    Penguin Putnam Inc
    Imprint name
    Penguin USA
    Publication date
    31 December 2012
    Publication City/Country
    New York, NY
    Author Information
    Jared Diamond is a professor of geography at the University of California, Los Angeles. He began his scientific career in physiology and expanded into evolutionary biology and biogeography. Among his many awards are the National Medal of Science, the Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement, Japan's Cosmos Prize, a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship, and the Lewis Thomas Prize honoring the Scientist as Poet, presented by The Rockefeller University. His previous books include "Why Is Sex Fun?," "The Third Chimpanzee," "Collapse," "The World Until Yesterday, " and "Guns, Germs, and Steel," winner of the Pulitzer Prize.
    Review quote
    "Challenging and smart...By focusing his infectious intellect and incredible experience on nine broad areas -- peace and war, young and old, danger and response, religion, language and health -- and sifting through thousands of years of customs across 39 traditional societies, Diamond shows us many features of the past that we would be wise to adopt." --Minneapolis Star Tribune "The World Until Yesterday [is] a fascinating and valuable look at what the rest of us have to learn from - and perhaps offer to - our more traditional kin." --Christian Science Monitor "Ambitious and erudite, drawing on Diamond's seemingly encyclopedic knowledge of fields such as anthropology, sociology, linguistics, physiology, nutrition and evolutionary biology. Diamond is a Renaissance man, a serious scholar and an audacious generalist, with a gift for synthesizing data and theories." --The Chicago Tribune "The World Until Yesterday is another eye-opening and completely enchanting book by one of our major intellectual forces, as a writer, a thinker, a scientist, a human being. It's a rare treasure, both as an illuminating personal memoir and an engrossing look into the heart of traditional societies and the timely lessons they can offer us. Its unique spell is irresistible." --Diane Ackerman, author of The Zookeeper's Wife "As always, Diamond manages to combine a daring breadth of scope, rigorous technical detail and personal anecdotes that are often quite moving." --The Cleveland Plain Dealer "Diamond's investigation of a selection of traditional societies, and within them a selection of how they contend with various issues[...]is leisurely but not complacent, informed but not claiming omniscience[...]A symphonic yet unromantic portrait of traditional societies and the often stirring lessons they offer."--Kirkus, Starred Review "This is the most personal of Diamond's books, a natural follow-up to his brilliant Guns, Germ