The Winner's Curse: Paradoxes and Anomalies of Economic Life

The Winner's Curse: Paradoxes and Anomalies of Economic Life

Paperback

By (author) Richard H. Thaler

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  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • Format: Paperback | 240 pages
  • Dimensions: 150mm x 231mm x 15mm | 295g
  • Publication date: 30 January 1994
  • Publication City/Country: New Jersey
  • ISBN 10: 0691019347
  • ISBN 13: 9780691019345
  • Edition statement: Reprint
  • Illustrations note: Ill.
  • Sales rank: 263,105

Product description

Richard Thaler challenges the received economic wisdom by revealing many of the paradoxes that abound even in the most painstakingly constructed transactions. He presents literate, challenging, and often funny examples of such anomalies as why the winners at auctions are often the real losers--they pay too much and suffer the "winner's curse"--why gamblers bet on long shots at the end of a losing day, why shoppers will save on one appliance only to pass up the identical savings on another, and why sports fans who wouldn't pay more than $200 for a Super Bowl ticket wouldn't sell one they own for less than $400. He also demonstrates that markets do not always operate with the traplike efficiency we impute to them. An ebook edition is available from The Free Press at leading on-line booksellers.

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Review quote

"By unraveling a series of real-world puzzles with philosophical and practical implications, Thaler illuminates some fairly abstruse ideas in an entertaining way... The best minds in economics today, as Thaler's provocative book suggests, are trying to supplement [insights into markets and prices] with a broader understanding of what makes people tick."--Christopher Farrell, Business Week "Richard Thaler ... stylishly recounts empirical findings that skewer hitherto sheltered economic beliefs."--Lola L. Lopes, Contemporary Psychology

Back cover copy

Richard Thaler challenges the received economic wisdom by revealing many of the paradoxes that abound even in the most painstakingly constructed transactions. He presents literate, challenging, and often funny examples of such anomalies as why the winners at auctions are often the real losers - they pay too much and suffer the "winner's curse" - why gamblers bet on long shots at the end of a losing day, why shoppers will save on one appliance only to pass up the identical savings on another, and why sports fans who wouldn't pay more than $200 for a Super Bowl ticket wouldn't sell one they own for less than $400. He also demonstrates that markets do not always operate with the traplike efficiency we impute to them. Thaler argues that recognizing these sometimes topsy-turvy facts of economic behavior will compel economists, as well as those of us who live by their lights in our jobs and organizations, to adopt a more balanced view of human nature, one reflected in Adam Smith's professed belief that, despite our selfishness, there is something in our nature that prompts us to enjoy, even promote, the happiness of others.

Table of contents

Acknowledgments1Introduction12Cooperation63The Ultimatum Game214Interindustry Wage Differentials365The Winner's Curse506The Endowment Effect, Loss Aversion, and Status Quo Bias637Preference Reversals798Intertemporal Choice929Savings, Fungibility, and Mental Accounts10710Pari-mutuel Betting Markets12211Calendar Effects in the Stock Market13912A Mean Reverting Walk Down Wall Street15113Closed-End Mutual Funds16814Foreign Exchange18215Epilogue197References199Index225