The Wind in the Willows

The Wind in the Willows

Hardback Collector's Library

By (author) Kenneth Grahame, Illustrated by Arthur Rackham, Afterword by David Stuart Davies

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  • Publisher: Collector's Library
  • Format: Hardback | 264 pages
  • Dimensions: 96mm x 148mm x 16mm | 159g
  • Publication date: 1 March 2012
  • Publication City/Country: Cirencester
  • ISBN 10: 1904919510
  • ISBN 13: 9781904919513
  • Edition: New edition
  • Edition statement: New edition
  • Illustrations note: illustrations
  • Sales rank: 25,601

Product description

When Mole goes boating with the Water Rat instead of spring-cleaning, he discovers a new world. As well as the river and the Wild Wood, there is Toad's craze for fast travel: which leads him and his friends on a whirl of trains, barges, gipsy caravans and motor cars, and into a lot of trouble.

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Author information

President Theodore Roosevelt wrote "I have read it and reread it, and have come to accept the characters as old friends."

Editorial reviews

Does The Wind in the Willows need an annotated edition? Suggesting that Grahame's prose, "encrusted with the patina of age and affect," has become an obstacle to full appreciation of the work, Lerer offers the text with running disquisitions in the margins on now-archaic words and phrases, Edwardian social mores and a rich array of literary references from Aesop to Gilbert and Sullivan. Occasionally he goes over the top - making, for instance, frequent references alongside Toad's supposed mental breakdown to passages from Kraft-Ebing's writings on clinical insanity - and, as in his controversial Children's Literature, a Reader's History from Aesop to Harry Potter (2008), displays a narcissistic streak: "This new edition brings The Wind in the Willows...into the ambit of contemporary scholarship and criticism on children's literature..." Still, the commentary will make enlightening reading for parents or other adults who think that there's nothing in the story for them - and a closing essay on (among other topics) the links between Ernest Shepard's art for this and for Winnie the Pooh makes an intriguing lagniappe. (selective resource list) (Literary analysis. Adult/professional) (Kirkus Reviews)