Wind in the Willows

Wind in the Willows

By (author) Kenneth Grahame , Illustrated by Robert Ingpen

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First published in 1908, Kenneth Grahame's story of the riverbank adventures of Mole, Ratty, Badger and the exasperating Mr. Toad has become a true classic of English literature, loved by children and adults alike.

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  • Hardback | 192 pages
  • 202 x 240 x 34mm | 1,138.51g
  • 01 Sep 2007
  • Templar Publishing
  • Surrey
  • English
  • full colour illustrations throughout
  • 1840113529
  • 9781840113525
  • 8,001

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Author Information

Robert Ingpen was born in 1936 in Geelong, Australia. He studied illustration art and book design at The Royal Melbourne Institue of Technology. In 1986 he was awarded the Hans Christian Andersen Medal for his contribution to children's literature and he has been honoured with Membership of the Order of Australia. A world-renowned artist and author, Ingpen has designed, illustrated and written more than one hundred books. His work includes his highly acclaimed series of illustrated children's classics, a unique achievement by one illustrator, which have now been published in many editions around the world. Robert now lives and works in Barwon Heads, Australia, near his hometown of Geelong.

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Review text

Does The Wind in the Willows need an annotated edition? Suggesting that Grahame's prose, "encrusted with the patina of age and affect," has become an obstacle to full appreciation of the work, Lerer offers the text with running disquisitions in the margins on now-archaic words and phrases, Edwardian social mores and a rich array of literary references from Aesop to Gilbert and Sullivan. Occasionally he goes over the top - making, for instance, frequent references alongside Toad's supposed mental breakdown to passages from Kraft-Ebing's writings on clinical insanity - and, as in his controversial Children's Literature, a Reader's History from Aesop to Harry Potter (2008), displays a narcissistic streak: "This new edition brings The Wind in the Willows...into the ambit of contemporary scholarship and criticism on children's literature..." Still, the commentary will make enlightening reading for parents or other adults who think that there's nothing in the story for them - and a closing essay on (among other topics) the links between Ernest Shepard's art for this and for Winnie the Pooh makes an intriguing lagniappe. (selective resource list) (Literary analysis. Adult/professional) (Kirkus Reviews)

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