Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail

Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail

Hardback Thorndike Biography

By (author) Cheryl Strayed

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  • Publisher: Thorndike Press
  • Format: Hardback | 623 pages
  • Dimensions: 145mm x 218mm x 33mm | 658g
  • Publication date: 5 April 2013
  • ISBN 10: 1410457192
  • ISBN 13: 9781410457196
  • Edition: Large type / large print
  • Edition statement: large type edition
  • Sales rank: 1,374,321

Product description

A Best Nonfiction Book of 2012: "The Boston Globe," "Entertainment Weekly "A Best Book of the Year: NPR, "St. Louis Dispatch, Vogue" At twenty-two, Cheryl Strayed thought she had lost everything. In the wake of her mother's death, her family scattered and her own marriage was soon destroyed. Four years later, with nothing more to lose, she made the most impulsive decision of her life. With no experience or training, driven only by blind will, she would hike more than a thousand miles of the Pacific Crest Trail from the Mojave Desert through California and Oregon to Washington State--and she would do it alone. Told with suspense and style, sparkling with warmth and humor, "Wild" powerfully captures the terrors and pleasures of one young woman forging ahead against all odds on a journey that maddened, strengthened, and ultimately healed her.

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Author information

Cheryl Strayed is the author of the critically-acclaimed novel "Torch," which was a finalist for the Great Lakes Book Award and was selected by "The Oregonian "as one of the top ten books of 2006 by Pacific Northwest authors; a memoir, "Wild"; and "Tiny Beautiful Things: Advice on Love and Life from Dear Sugar." Her stories and essays have appeared in numerous magazines and journals, including "The New York Times Magazine," "The""Washington Post Magazine," " Vogue," "The Rumpus," "Self," "The Missouri Review," and "The Sun." Her essays have been included in the Pushcart Prize anthology and twice in "The Best American Essays." She lives in Portland, Oregon.

Review quote

"A rich, riveting true story . . . During her grueling three-month journey, Strayed circled around black bears and rattlesnakes, fought extreme dehydration by drinking oily gray pond water, and hiked in boots made entirely of duct tape. Reading her matter-of-fact take on love and grief and the soul-saving quality of a Snapple lemonade, you can understand why Strayed has earned a cult following as the author of Dear Sugar, a popular advice column on therumpus.net. . . . With its vivid descriptions of beautiful but unforgiving terrain, "Wild" is a cinematic story, but Strayed's book isn't really about big, cathartic moments. The author never 'finds herself' or gets healed. When she reaches the trail's end, she buys a cheap ice cream cone and continues down the road. . . . It's hard to imagine anything more important than taking one step at a time. That's endurance, and that's what Strayed understands, almost 20 years later. As she writes, 'There was only one [option], I knew. To keep walking.' Our verdict: A." --Melissa Maerz, "Entertainment Weekly" "Strayed's journey was as transcendent as it was turbulent. She faced down hunger, thirst, injury, fatigue, boredom, loss, bad weather, and wild animals. Yet she also reached new levels of joy, accomplishment, courage, peace, and found extraordinary companionship." --Marjorie Kehe, "Christian Science Monitor" "It's not very manly, the topic of weeping while reading. Yet for a book critic tears are an occupational hazard. Luckily, perhaps, books don't make me cry very often. Turning pages, I'm practically Steve McQueen. Strayed's memoir, "Wild," however, pretty much obliterated me. I was reduced, during her book's final third, to puddle-eyed cretinism. I like to read in coffee shops, and I began to receive concerned glances from matronly women, the kind of looks that said, 'Oh, honey.' To mention all this does Strayed a bit of a disservice, because there's nothing cloying about "Wild." It's uplifting, but no