Where are the Night Animals?

Where are the Night Animals?

Paperback Let's Read-And-Find-Out Science (Paperback)

By (author) Mary Ann Fraser

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  • Publisher: HarperCollins
  • Format: Paperback | 32 pages
  • Dimensions: 198mm x 248mm x 6mm | 141g
  • Publication date: 22 April 1999
  • Publication City/Country: New York, NY
  • ISBN 10: 0064451763
  • ISBN 13: 9780064451765
  • Illustrations note: full colour illustrations
  • Sales rank: 206,429

Product description

Did you know that a barn owl has one ear higher than the other? This helps it find squeaking mice that humans can't hear. Baby opossum hang on to their mother's fur for safety. Read and find out more about what nocturnal animals do as we sleep.Outstanding Science Trade Books for Children 2000 -- selected by Natn'l Science Tchrs Assoc. & Child. Bk Cncl.

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Editorial reviews

This Stage 1 entry in the Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science series focuses on eight common nocturnal creatures, from the barn owl to the harvest mouse. Each animal is introduced through a simple action: coyote hunts, opossum munches berries, tree frog calls to its mate with a "Kreck-ek, kreck-ek." The text is curiously disrupted by a middle spread of the dawn and definitions of the terms diurnal and nocturnal; the nighttime animals run for cover, but on the next page, readers are returned to sunset and the examination of those animals resumes. Fraser then emphasizes their interrelatedness: skunk sprays coyote for coming too close, barn owl snatches up mouse, raccoon snatches a crayfish, brown bat seeks out insects. A final spread shows morning, where a pajama-wearing child and raccoon meet through a window glass as "the night shift ends. The day shift begins." Naturalistic illustrations provide stills of each animal against deep blues, teals, and aquamarines; endnotes explain where nocturnal animals hide during the day. (Kirkus Reviews)