When Species Meet

When Species Meet

Paperback PostHumanities (Paperback)

By (author) Donna J. Haraway

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  • Publisher: University of Minnesota Press
  • Format: Paperback | 360 pages
  • Dimensions: 150mm x 226mm x 30mm | 567g
  • Publication date: 26 November 2007
  • Publication City/Country: Minneapolis
  • ISBN 10: 0816650462
  • ISBN 13: 9780816650460
  • Sales rank: 57,799

Product description

Haraway focuses on the interactions of humans with many kinds of animals, especially with those called domestic. From designer pets to lab animals, to trained therapy dogs, she explores philosophical, cultural, and biological aspects of human-animal encounters.

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Review quote

Donna Haraway's latest book, "When Species Meet," is a stunning meditation on the ordinary. Tying together questions of interspecies encounters and alternative practices of world building, Haraway explores how contemporary human beings interact with various critters to form meanings, experiences, and worlds. The text effortlessly slides between theory and autobiography; one of the driving connections in this regard is Ms. Cayenne Pepper, an Australian sheepdog whose "darter-tongue kisses" compel Haraway to look closely at what biologist Lynn Margulis calls "symbiogenesis," a process that explains how life forms continually intermingle, leading to ever more "intricate and multidirectional acts of association of and with other life forms." From lab animals to interspecies love to breeding purebreds, Haraway ensures that her readers will never look at human-animal encounters of any sort in the same way again. While those familiar with Haraway's oeuvre will find numerous connections to her earlier work, she does an excellent job of narrating how she came to the questions at the heart of "When Species Meet "and (perhaps most importantly) what is at stake for her in these questions, politically and otherwise. Of particular interest to philosophy buffs are Haraway's gratifying critiques of Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari's well-known writing on "becoming-animal"; these critiques arise as part of Haraway's overall challenge to the boundaries between "wild" or "domestic" creatures. Similarly, her response to Jacques Derrida's ruminations on animals reveals the provocations that can arise from work that pokes holes in conventional disciplinary engagements with any given topic. Haraway's willingness to take on both biology and philosophy, to cite only two of her resources, results in suggestive insights on a number of issues, but especially (with Derrida, et. al.) regarding the question of what it means to take animals seriously. I found Haraway's considerableb