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    Under a Flaming Sky: The Great Hinckley Firestorm of 1894 (P.s.) (Paperback) By (author) Daniel James Brown

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    DescriptionOn September 1, 1894, two forest fires converged on the town of Hinckley, Minnesota, trapping more than two thousand people. The fire created its own weather, including hurricane-strength winds, bubbles of plasma-like glowing gas, and 200-foot-tall flames. As temperatures reached 1,600 degrees Fahrenheit, the firestorm knocked down buildings and carried flaming debris high into the sky. Two trains--one with every single car on fire--became the only means of escape. In all, more than four hundred people would die, leading to a revolution in forestry management and the birth of federal agencies that monitor and fight wildfires.A spellbinding account of danger, devastation, and courage, Under a Flaming Sky reveals the dramatic, minute-by-minute story of the tragedy and brings into focus the ordinary citizens whose lives it irrevocably marked.


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  • Full bibliographic data for Under a Flaming Sky

    Title
    Under a Flaming Sky
    Subtitle
    The Great Hinckley Firestorm of 1894
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Daniel James Brown
    Physical properties
    Format: Paperback
    Number of pages: 256
    Width: 141 mm
    Height: 202 mm
    Thickness: 19 mm
    Weight: 263 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780061236259
    ISBN 10: 006123625X
    Classifications

    B&T Merchandise Category: GEN
    B&T Book Type: NF
    BIC subject category V2: HBLL
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: T5.2
    BIC E4L: HIS
    BIC time period qualifier V2: 3JH
    BIC subject category V2: HBJK
    B&T Modifier: Region of Publication: 01
    B&T Modifier: Academic Level: 05
    BIC subject category V2: RNR
    Ingram Theme: CHRN/LATE18
    Ingram Subject Code: HS
    B&T General Subject: 430
    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 27610
    B&T Modifier: Geographic Designator: D6
    LC subject heading:
    Libri: I-HS
    BIC geographical qualifier V2: 1KBBN
    LC subject heading:
    Ingram Theme: CULT/UPMIDW, CULT/MIDWST, GEOG/MINNES
    BISAC V2.8: HIS036040, NAT023000, HIS036090
    DC22: 977.662
    DC21: 977.662
    B&T Approval Code: A72324036, A16504680
    DC22: 977.6/62
    LC subject heading: , ,
    LC classification: F614.H6 B76 2007
    LC subject heading:
    BISAC region code: 4.0.1.4.6.0.0
    LC subject heading:
    Thema V1.0: NHK, RNR, WQH
    Edition statement
    Reprint
    Publisher
    HARPER PERENNIAL
    Imprint name
    HARPER PERENNIAL
    Publication date
    14 August 2007
    Publication City/Country
    New York, NY
    Back cover copy
    On September 1, 1894 two forest fires converged on the town of Hinckley, Minnesota, trapping over two thousand people. Daniel James Brown recounts the events surrounding the fire in Under a Flaming Sky, the most gripping and comprehensive chronicle of how the dramatic story unfolded. Whereas Oregon's famous "Biscuit" fire in 2002 took more than a week to burn its first 350,000 acres, the Hinckley fire did the same amount of damage in only five hours. The fire created its own weather, including hurricane-strength winds, bubbles of plasma-like glowing gas, and 200-foot-tall flames. In some instances, "fire whirls," or tornadoes of fire, danced out from the main body of the fire, knocking down buildings and carrying flaming debris high into the sky. Temperatures reached 1,600 degrees Fahrenheit--the melting point of steel. As the fire surrounded the town, two railroads became the only means of escape. Both trains ran the gauntlet of fire. One train caught on fire from one end to the other. A heroic young African-American porter ran up and down the length of the train, reassuring the passengers even as the flames tore at their clothes. On the other train, the engineer refused to back out of town until the last possible minute of escape. In all, more than four hundred people died, leading to a revolution in forestry management practices and the birth of federal agencies that monitor and fight wildfires today.