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Two Novels: The Stony Heart and B/Moondocks

Two Novels: The Stony Heart and B/Moondocks

Paperback German and Austrian Literature

By (author) Arno Schmidt, Translated by John Woods

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  • Publisher: Dalkey Archive Press
  • Format: Paperback | 432 pages
  • Dimensions: 152mm x 226mm x 33mm | 635g
  • Publication date: 15 July 2011
  • Publication City/Country: Normal, IL
  • ISBN 10: 1564786625
  • ISBN 13: 9781564786623
  • Edition statement: Reprint
  • Sales rank: 257,371

Product description

This is the last in a four volume edition of the early fiction of one of the most daring and influential writers of postwar Germany, a man often called the German James Joyce due to the linguistic inventiveness of his fiction. Among Schmidt enthusiasts, scholars, and fans, the two novels stand in sharp contrast to one another, the first belonging to his early, more realistic phase, and the second introducing his later, more experimental phase. But the hairs are not worth splitting. Taking place in 1954, The Stony Heart concerns a man gathering documents for a study of a historian, and in the course of his search he gets involved with a woman who is married to a man who is involved with a woman, etc. B/Moondocks has parallel stories, one played out in a rural German town in the late 1950s, and the other on the moon in 1980 (the book was first published in German in 1960). At the heart of both is an absolute commitment to two things: freeing language from its commonplace prose functions, and Schmidt's ongoing savage attack on the German mind-set and attitude that gave us two world wars in this century.

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Review quote

In a style often compared to that of Joyce's Finnegans Wake, Schmidt creates a kind of dreamlike narration that relies heavily on wordplay (especially neologisms) and floats in and out of the ...more characters' subconsciouses . . . Schmidt captures a colloquial German speech that Woods deftly translates.