Tourists of History: Memory, Kitsch, and Consumerism from Oklahoma City to Ground Zero

Tourists of History: Memory, Kitsch, and Consumerism from Oklahoma City to Ground Zero

Hardback

By (author) Marita Sturken

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Format
Paperback $19.45
  • Publisher: Duke University Press
  • Format: Hardback | 360 pages
  • Dimensions: 155mm x 236mm x 25mm | 181g
  • Publication date: 30 November 2007
  • Publication City/Country: North Carolina
  • ISBN 10: 0822341034
  • ISBN 13: 9780822341031
  • Sales rank: 1,652,131

Product description

In Tourists of History, the cultural critic Marita Sturken argues that over the past two decades, Americans have responded to national trauma through consumerism, kitsch sentiment, and tourist practices in ways that reveal a tenacious investment in the idea of America's innocence. Sturken investigates the consumerism that followed from the September 11th attacks; the contentious, ongoing debates about memorials and celebrity-architect designed buildings at Ground Zero; and the two primary outcomes of the bombing of the Federal Building in Oklahoma City, the Oklahoma City National Memorial and the execution of Timothy McVeigh. Sturken contends that a consumer culture of comfort objects such as a World Trade Center snow globes, FDNY teddy bears, and Oklahoma City Memorial t-shirts and branded water, as well as re-enactments of traumatic events in memorial and architectural designs, enables a national tendency to see U.S. culture as distant from both history and world politics. A kitsch comfort culture contributes to a "tourist" relationship to history: Americans can feel good about visiting and buying souvenirs at sites of national mourning without have to engage with the economic, social, and political causes of the violent events. While arguing for the importance of remembering tragic losses of life, Sturken is urging attention to a dangerous confluence - of memory, tourism, consumerism, paranoia, security, and kitsch - that promulgates fear to sell safety, offers prepackaged emotion at the expense of critical thought, contains alternative politics, and facilitates public acquiescence in the federal government's repressive measures at home and its aggressive political and military policies abroad.

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Author information

Marita Sturken is a professor of culture and communication at New York University. She is the author of "Tangled Memories: The Vietnam War, the AIDS Epidemic, and the Politics of Remembering" and a coauthor of "Practices of Looking: An Introduction to Visual Culture."

Review quote

"Tourists of History is a fearless guide through the paranoid landscape of contemporary American culture. Marita Sturken brilliantly maps the ways consumerism and tourism offer avenues of comfort in a threatening world at the same time that they become politically disabling. From the responses to the Oklahoma City bombing to the memorials to the Twin Towers, Sturken shows how the American way of mourning and remembering the dead shores up a conviction in a timeless sense of national innocence. This exceptionally timely book reaches deep into the past and will continue to resonate in the future."--Amy Kaplan, author of The Anarchy of Empire in the Making of U.S. Culture "Tourists of History is a great read: well written, accessible on numerous levels, and driven by a persuasive argument that links tourism, consumerism, and Americans' understandings of themselves and their history."--Erika Doss, author of Spirit Poles and Flying Pigs: Public Art and Cultural Democracy in American Communities

Back cover copy

""Tourists of History" is a great read: well written, accessible on numerous levels, and driven by a persuasive argument that links tourism, consumerism, and Americans' understandings of themselves and their history."--Erika Doss, author of "Spirit Poles and Flying Pigs: Public Art and Cultural Democracy in American Communities"

Table of contents

Introduction; 1. Consuming fear and selling security; 2. Citizens and survivors: Cultural memory and Oklahoma City; 3. The spectacle of death and the spectacle of grief: The execution of Timothy McVeigh; 4. Tourism and "Sacred Ground": The space of Ground Zero; 5. Architects of grief and the aesthetics of absence; Conclusion