• Touch of Light: The Story of Louis Braille

    Touch of Light: The Story of Louis Braille (Hardback) By (author) Anne E. Neimark

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    DescriptionThe life of the nineteenth-century Frenchman who invented a system of reading for the blind that is used universally.


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  • Full bibliographic data for Touch of Light

    Title
    Touch of Light
    Subtitle
    The Story of Louis Braille
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Anne E. Neimark
    Physical properties
    Format: Hardback
    Number of pages: 186
    Width: 137 mm
    Height: 198 mm
    Thickness: 20 mm
    Weight: 454 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780152896058
    ISBN 10: 0152896058
    Classifications

    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: Z99.9
    Publisher
    Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
    Imprint name
    Harcourt Publishers Ltd
    Publication date
    26 May 1970
    Review text
    A blind man's gift to the blind of a touch of light begs the lighter touch of Seeing Fingers (Etta De Gering, 1962). The fabricated conversations here call attention to themselves from the moment when Louis as a child of three - not sounding like a child of three - destroys his own sight with one slip of a forbidden tool and learns to adjust to living in darkness. Out, out and non, non dot the dialogue as maudlin commentary obscures the descriptions: of boyhood in wartime, of familial warmth and support, of friendship with the local Abbe who arranges a scholarship for Louis Braille at the national school for the blind. His creation of a coded alphabet was the result of disappointment with the impractical raised-letter books in use; and the rest of his brief, tubercular lite was dedicated to promulgating its acceptance. There is some creditable emphasis on Louis transcription of musical notation as well, but the prickliest questions of how are avoided (or evaded) in favor of unprobing reverence. (Kirkus Reviews)