• Tony Blair: In His Own Words See large image

    Tony Blair: In His Own Words (Paperback) By (author) Tony Blair, Edited by Paul Richards

    Unavailable

    Sorry we can't get this title, the button below links through to AbeBooks who may have this title (opens in new window).

    Try AbeBooks | Add to wishlist

Other books

Other people who viewed this bought | Other books in this category
Showing items 1 to 10 of 10

 

Reviews | Bibliographic data
  • Full bibliographic data for Tony Blair

    Title
    Tony Blair
    Subtitle
    In His Own Words
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Tony Blair, Edited by Paul Richards
    Physical properties
    Format: Paperback
    Number of pages: 368
    Width: 135 mm
    Height: 216 mm
    Thickness: 28 mm
    Weight: 426 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9781842750896
    ISBN 10: 1842750895
    Classifications

    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 27430
    BIC E4L: POL
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: T7.5
    BIC geographical qualifier V2: 1DBK
    LC classification: JN231
    BIC subject category V2: JP
    LC subject heading:
    DC21: 320.941
    LC subject heading:
    BISAC V2.8: POL000000
    BIC subject category V2: 1DBK
    Publisher
    Methuen Publishing Ltd
    Imprint name
    Politico's Publishing Ltd
    Publication date
    15 September 2004
    Publication City/Country
    London
    Review text
    A solid summary of Blair's climb to the top of the greasy pole, this collection of the Prime Minister's articles and speeches takes us from his early political beginnings right through to the war in Iraq and the Hutton Inquiry. There's little light relief in this relentless rhetoric, although we are treated to an early copy of Blair's CV in which he hilariously misspells his own name. Perhaps even more embarrassingly, editor Paul Richards (a Labour stalwart) has also included Blair's statement claiming that the Millennium Dome (remember that?) 'will be the envy of the world'. Elsewhere, there's famous sermons on the NHS, crime and 'education, education, education', all of which serves as a useful precis of recent political history. Labour luvvies will obviously lap this up, but there's enough here to satisfy anyone with more than a passing interest in the man running the country. (Kirkus UK)