The Time Traveler's Wife

The Time Traveler's Wife

By (author)


You save US$0.05

Free delivery worldwide

Dispatched from the UK in 2 business days

When will my order arrive?

This extraordinary, magical novel is the story of Clare and Henry who have known each other since Clare was six and Henry was thirty-six, and were married when Clare was twenty-two and Henry thirty. Impossible but true, because Henry is one of the first people diagnosed with Chrono-Displacement Disorder: periodically his genetic clock resets and he finds himself pulled suddenly into his past or future. His disappearances are spontaneous and his experiences are alternately harrowing and amusing. The Time Traveler's Wife depicts the effects of time travel on Henry and Clare's passionate love for each other with grace and humour. Their struggle to lead normal lives in the face of a force they can neither prevent nor control is intensely moving and entirely unforgettable.

show more
  • Paperback | 624 pages
  • 110 x 176 x 46mm | 381.02g
  • Vintage Publishing
  • LondonUnited Kingdom
  • English
  • 0099546183
  • 9780099546184
  • 2,513

Other books in Contemporary Fiction

Other people who viewed this bought:

Review quote

"Moving, but worth the heartbreak" -- Glynis Barber Daily Express "At it's core The Time Traveler's Wife is an old-fashioned love story. A terrific book-startlingly original construction'" Observer "I was ridiculously entranced by Audrey Niffenegger's big, reckless novel-utterly convincing" Daily Telegraph "Niffenegger exploits the possibilities of her fantasy scenario with immense skill: no wonder this novel has spent weeks on the bestseller lists in the US. This is one of those books that makes you want to eat it up from start to finish" Guardian "Wonky, sexy, incredible" The Times

show more

About Audrey Niffenegger

Audrey Niffenegger is a visual artist and writer who lives mostly in Chicago and occasionally in London. She has published six books, including the novels The Time Traveler's Wife and Her Fearful Symmetry. She helped to found the Columbia College Chicago Center for Book and Paper Arts. Her art has been exhibited by Printworks Gallery in Chicago since 1986. She is a Professor in the Fiction Department of Columbia College. Her recent projects include a ballet, Raven Girl, in collaboration with Wayne McGregor for the Royal Opera House Ballet.

show more

Customer reviews

A good book. It takes a bit of getting used to the format but once you work it out it's easy and is actually quite intrigueing thinking about how all the time travel fits together. I enjoyed more
by David and Kate Cook
This is actually the 2nd time I have read this book because I thought I had missed something the 1st time round. Everyone seems to be raving about it since the film came out, but I really don't think I did (miss anything)! Don't get me wrong it is a very cleverly written book and an ingenius topic, but I find all the flipping backwards a bit of a bind! It puts me off my stride whilst reading and gets in the way of me enjoying the book. I really wanted to like it and I do in many ways, I just find it too disjointed for my tastes. Sorry!show more
by Penny Cunningham
I can see why so many people loved this book - there's something in it for everyone! I don't normally enjoy science fiction so I originally had my reservations about the time travelling aspect of this story. My concerns about the time travelling and its potential â?~gimmick' factor were completely unfounded though. This ambitious concept was so skilfully executed it simply added to the telling of what is ultimately a modern day love story. By love story I don't just mean romance, I mean enduring love, admiration and respect found in a variety of relationships. Niffenegger's use of a dual narrative presents the tale from the two lead character's differing perspectives. This adds immense depth to the telling of the story; it also removed the need for laborious descriptive detail. The lead characters, Henry and Clare, are strikingly real despite the very unreal situations they find themselves in. They are not perfect, they don't always do the right thing and that simply heightens their likeability. This is a story that could be enjoyed by men and women in equal measure. If I had to describe this story in one word, that word would be â?~moving'. On one level, it is a very clever telling of an excellent story. On a deeper level, it's a valuable reminder of the fragility of our lives and the virtues of living in the moment - carpe diem!show more
by Joanne Peulen