Time Reborn: From the Crisis in Physics to the Future of the Universe

Time Reborn: From the Crisis in Physics to the Future of the Universe

Hardback

By (author) Professor of Physics Lee Smolin

USD$27.99
List price $28.00
You save $0.01

Free delivery worldwide
Available
Dispatched in 5 business days
When will my order arrive?

Additional formats available

Format
Paperback $11.77
  • Publisher: HOUGHTON MIFFLIN
  • Format: Hardback | 319 pages
  • Dimensions: 157mm x 229mm x 33mm | 544g
  • Publication date: 23 April 2013
  • ISBN 10: 0547511728
  • ISBN 13: 9780547511726
  • Illustrations note: black & white illustrations
  • Sales rank: 64,406

Product description

From one of our foremost thinkers and public intellectuals, a radical new view of the nature of time and the cosmos What is time? This deceptively simple question is the single most important problem facing science as we probe more deeply into the fundamentals of the universe. All of the mysteries physicists and cosmologists face--from the Big Bang to the future of the universe, from the puzzles of quantum physics to the unification of forces and particles--come down to the nature of time. The fact that time is real may seem obvious. You experience it passing every day when you watch clocks tick, bread toast, and children grow. But most physicists, from Newton to Einstein to today's quantum theorists, have seen things differently. The scientific case for time being an illusion is formidable. That is why the consequences of adopting the view that time is real are revolutionary. Lee Smolin, author of the controversial bestseller "The Trouble with Physics," argues that a limited notion of time is holding physics back. It's time for a major revolution in scientific thought. The reality of time could be the key to the next big breakthrough in theoretical physics. What if the laws of physics themselves were not timeless? What if they could evolve? "Time Reborn" offers a radical new approach to cosmology that embraces the reality of time and opens up a whole new universe of possibilities. There are few ideas that, like our notion of time, shape our thinking about literally everything, with huge implications for physics and beyond--from climate change to the economic crisis. Smolin explains in lively and lucid prose how the true nature of time impacts our world.

Other people who viewed this bought:

Showing items 1 to 10 of 10

Other books in this category

Showing items 1 to 10 of 10
Categories:

Author information

LEE SMOLIN has made influential contributions to the search for a unification of physics. He is a founding faculty member of the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics. His previous books include "The Trouble with Physics, ""The Life of the Cosmos, " and "Three Roads to Quantum Gravity."

Review quote

"Was Einstein wrong? At least in his understanding of time, Smolin argues, the great theorist of relativity was dead wrong. What is worse, by firmly enshrining his error in scientific orthodoxy, Einstein trapped his successors in insoluble dilemmas as they try to devise timeless laws explaining the origins and structure of the cosmos. How, Smolin asks, can such laws account for the highly improbable set of conditions that triggered the Big Bang jump-starting the universe? How, Smolin further wants to know, can scientists ever empirically test their timeless cosmic hypotheses? With rare conceptual daring, Smolin beckons toward a new perspective for doing cosmological theory, a perspective allowing Leibniz's principle of sufficient reason to open surprising possibilities. This horizon not only readmits time as a reality; it enshrines time as the reality, the indispensable point of flux allowing everything else, including the laws of matter and energy, to evolve and change. Embracing time as real, Smolin asserts, will allow cosmologists to convert laws once regarded as timeless into the contingent data they need to develop testable new theories of galactic evolution. More immediately, Smolin anticipates that this paradigm shift will help climatologists understand global warming and economists to ameliorate financial turbulence. A thrilling intellectual ride!" --"Booklist," STARRED review "Contrary to Plato and Einstein, theoretical physicist Smolin ("The Trouble with Physics") asserts that 'not only is time real, but nothing we know or experience gets closer to the heart of nature than the reality of time.' Though time has always been a quantity to measure, the author explains that in the 17th century, scientists began wondering whether 'the world is in essence mathematical or it lives in time.' Newton's laws of motion made time irrelevant, and 'Einstein's two theories of relativity are, at their most basic, theories of time--or, better, timelessness.' Galileo a