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    The Time of Our Lives: The Ethics of Common Sense (Paperback) By (author) Mortimer J. Adler, Introduction by Deal W. Hudson

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    DescriptionIs it a good time to be alive? Is ours a good society to be alive in? Is it possible to have a good life in our time? And finally, does a good life consist of having a good time? Are happiness and a good lifeinterchangeable? These are the questions that Mortimer Adler addresses himself to. The heart of the book lies in its conception of the good life for man, which provides the standard for measuring a century, a society, or a culture: for upon that turns the meaning of each man's primary moral right - his right to the pursuit of happiness. The moral philosophy that Dr. Adler expounds in terms of this conception he calls the ethics of common sense,because it is as a defense and development of the common-sense answer to the question can I really make a good life for myself?


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  • Full bibliographic data for The Time of Our Lives

    Title
    The Time of Our Lives
    Subtitle
    The Ethics of Common Sense
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Mortimer J. Adler, Introduction by Deal W. Hudson
    Physical properties
    Format: Paperback
    Number of pages: 361
    Width: 140 mm
    Height: 213 mm
    Thickness: 18 mm
    Weight: 249 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780823216703
    ISBN 10: 0823216705
    Classifications

    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 25220
    BIC E4L: PHI
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: S2.1
    B&T Book Type: NF
    B&T Modifier: Region of Publication: 01
    BISAC V2.8: PHI005000
    BIC subject category V2: HPQ
    B&T Modifier: Academic Level: 01
    LC subject heading:
    B&T General Subject: 610
    Ingram Subject Code: PH
    Libri: I-PH
    B&T Merchandise Category: POD
    LC subject heading:
    DC20: 170
    LC subject heading:
    B&T Approval Code: E10400000
    DC22: 171/.2, 171.2
    LC subject heading: ,
    LC classification: BJ1012.A3, BJ1012 .A3 1996
    Thema V1.0: QDTQ
    Edition statement
    Fordham Univ PR.
    Illustrations note
    black & white illustrations
    Publisher
    Fordham University Press
    Imprint name
    Fordham University Press
    Publication date
    01 April 1996
    Publication City/Country
    New York
    Author Information
    Mortimer J. Adler was the director of the Institute for Philosophical Research in Chicago and a member of the board of editors of the Encyclopedia Brittanica.
    Review quote
    Adler (director, Institute for Philosophical Research) lays the groundwork for a common sense approach to the problem of making a good life and evaluating that life in reference to the merits of present society. He offers standards by which to judge the merits of our time against those of previous centuries and other cultures, and shows the ways in which a culture encourages or discourages the individual in his or her efforts to make a good life.
    Review text
    For someone not sensitive to the intricacies of ethical theory and unwilling, to ponder the Freer points, this may all sound strikingly like advice from Ann Landers, but the sharp philosophy student will realize that it is essentially an expounding, extension, and refinement of moral insights derived from Aristotle's Nichomachean Ethics in a twentieth Century context. Adler's tract, based on his third series of Encyclopaedia Britannica-Lectures at the University of Chicago, is a high-level defense and development of seemingly simplistic common-sense answers to questions like: "How can I make a really good life for myself?"; "Is this a good time to be alive?"; "Is ours a good society to be alive in?" The central idea is that age-old "pursuit of happiness" but Adler imbues it with contemporary relevance by assessing the ways in which the culture of a society encourages or discourages efforts to make a good life (for a focus on the political factors, wait for Adler's next book). So although, yes indeed, this is a good time and a good society to be alive in, there is still a need for a moral and educational revolution, one must still work strenuously to rectify existing injustices through radical social, economic, and political reform (but New Leftists are lacking, in tree moral wisdom). Activists may be unmoved by the Aristotelian putdown, but there should be a considerable audience appreciative of this careful substantiation of enlightened common sense. (Kirkus Reviews)
    Back cover copy
    Is it a good time to be alive? Is ours a good society to be alive in? And finally, does a good life consist of having a good time? Are happiness and a "good life" interchangeable? These are the questions that Mortimer Adler addresses in this book. Carefully, Adler lays the groundwork for a common-sense approach to the problem of making a good life and of evaluating that life in reference to the merits of our present society. Adler offers standards by which we can judge the relative merits of our time against those of previous centuries, other societies and cultures. Adler answers in what ways culture encourages or discourages the individual in his or her efforts to make a good life. Finally, Adler argues for a moral and educational revolution as well as for strenuous efforts to rectify existing injustices by radical social, economic, and political reforms. The heart of the book lies in its conception of the good life, which provides the standard for measuring a century, a society, or a culture: for upon that turns the meaning of each individual's primary moral right - his right to the pursuit of happiness. The moral philosophy that Dr. Adler expounds in terms of this conception he calls "the ethics of common sense" because it is as a defense and development of the common-sense answer to the question "can I really make a good life for myself?"