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    A Thousand Machines: A Concise Philosophy of the Machine as Social Movement (Semiotext(e) Intervention) (Paperback) By (author) Gerald Raunig, Translated by Aileen Derieg

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    DescriptionIn this "concise philosophy of the machine," Gerald Raunig provides a historical and critical backdrop to a concept proposed forty years ago by the French philosophers Flix Guattari and Gilles Deleuze: the machine, not as a technical device and apparatus, but as a social composition and concatenation. This conception of the machine as an arrangement of technical, bodily, intellectual, and social components subverts the opposition between man and machine, organism and mechanism, individual and community. Drawing from an unusual range of films, literature, and performance--from the role of bicycles in Flann O'Brien's fiction to Vittorio de Sica's Neorealist film The Bicycle Thieves, and from Karl Marx's "Fragment on Machines" to the deus ex machina of Greek drama--Raunig arrives at an enhanced conception of the machine as a social movement, finding its most apt and concrete manifestation in the Euromayday movement, which since 2001 has become a transnational activist and discursive practice focused upon the precarious nature of labor and lives.


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  • Full bibliographic data for A Thousand Machines

    Title
    A Thousand Machines
    Subtitle
    A Concise Philosophy of the Machine as Social Movement
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Gerald Raunig, Translated by Aileen Derieg
    Physical properties
    Format: Paperback
    Number of pages: 120
    Width: 114 mm
    Height: 178 mm
    Thickness: 7 mm
    Weight: 113 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9781584350859
    ISBN 10: 1584350857
    Classifications

    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 27820
    BIC E4L: PHI
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: S2.1
    B&T Book Type: NF
    B&T Modifier: Region of Publication: 01
    B&T Modifier: Academic Level: 01
    B&T Modifier: Subject Development: 01
    BISAC V2.8: PHI019000
    BIC subject category V2: HPS
    DC22: 301
    LC subject heading:
    B&T Modifier: Continuations: 02
    BISAC V2.8: TEC052000
    Abridged Dewey: 301
    B&T General Subject: 610
    Ingram Subject Code: PH
    Libri: I-PH
    LC subject heading:
    B&T Merchandise Category: UP
    B&T Approval Code: A10150000, A10170000
    BISAC V2.8: BUS038000
    LC subject heading:
    B&T Approval Code: A80090000
    DC22: 300.1
    BISAC V2.8: PHI034000
    LC subject heading: ,
    LC classification: T14 .R3713 2010
    LC subject heading:
    Thema V1.0: QDTS
    Edition
    1
    Publisher
    AUTONOMEDIA
    Imprint name
    Semiotext (E)
    Publication date
    14 May 2010
    Publication City/Country
    New York
    Author Information
    Gerald Raunig is a philosopher and art theorist. He works at the Zurich University of the Arts, Zurich and the eipcp (European Institute for Progressive Cultural Policies), Vienna. He is coeditor of the multilingual Web journal Transversal and of Kulturrisse, the Austrian journal for radical democratic cultural politics. He is the author of Art and Revolution and A Thousand Machines, both published by Semiotext(e).
    Review quote
    "It is to Gerald Raunig's great credit that his essay reintroduces the concept of the machine as defined by Deleuze and Guattari; he examines it against the background of Marxist tradition, which has been articulated most innovatively in post-operaism. His work shows the possible intersections and continuities, but also points to discontinuities between these two theories which have evolved at markedly different periods." Maurizio Lazzarato