"The Third Man

"The Third Man

Paperback Penguin Twentieth-Century Classics

By (author) Graham Greene

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  • Publisher: Penguin Books Ltd
  • Format: Paperback | 160 pages
  • Dimensions: 128mm x 195mm x 12mm | 358g
  • Publication date: 1 July 1992
  • Publication City/Country: London
  • ISBN 10: 014018533X
  • ISBN 13: 9780140185331
  • Edition: New edition
  • Edition statement: New edition
  • Sales rank: 50,775

Product description

"The Third Man" is Greene's brilliant recreation of post-war Vienna, a city of desolate poverty occupied by four powers. Rollo Martins, a second-rate novelist, arrives penniless in Vienna to visit his old friend and hero Harry Lime. Harry is dead, but the circumstances surrounding his death are highly suspicious, and his reputation, at the very least, dubiousGraham Greene said of "The Third Man" that he 'wanted to entertain [people], to frighten them a little, to make them laugh' and the result is both a compeling narrative and a haunting thriller. "The Fallen Idol" is the chilling story of a small boy caught up in the games that adults play. Left in the care of the butler, Baines, and his wife, Philip realizes too late the danger of lies and deceit. But the truth is even deadlier.

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Author information

Graham Greene (1904-1991), whose long life nearly spanned the length of the twentieth century, was one of its greatest novelists. Educated at Berkhamsted School and Balliol College, Oxford, he started his career as a sub-editor of "The Times of London. "He began to attract notice as a novelist with his fourth book, "Orient Express, "in 1932. In 1935, he trekked across northern Liberia, his first experience in Africa, recounted in "A Journey Without Maps "(1936). He converted to Catholicism in 1926, an edifying decision, and reported on religious persecution in Mexico in 1938 in "The Lawless Roads, "which served as a background for his famous "The Power and the Glory," one of several Catholic novels ("Brighton Rock, The Heart of the Matter, The End of the Affair). "During the war he worked for the British secret service in Sierra Leone; afterward, he began wide-ranging travels as a journalist, which were reflected in novels such as "The Quiet American, Our Man in Havana, The Comedians, Travels with My Aunt, The Honorary Consul, The Human Factor, Monsignor Quixote, "and "The Captain and the Enemy. "In addition to his many novels, Graham Greene wrote several collections of short stories, four travel books, six plays, two books of autobiography "A Sort of Life "and "Ways of Escape" two biographies, and four books for children. He also contributed hundreds of essays and film and book reviews to "The Spectator "and other journals, many of which appear in the late collection "Reflections. "Most of his novels have been filmed, including "The Third Man," which the author first wrote as a film treatment. Graham Greene was named Companion of Honour and received the Order of Merit among numerous other awards."

Editorial reviews

The story for the motion picture which has had a sensationally successful critical and popular reception, this although it may not be as "finished" (the author) as the film for which it was written, is still a highly effective experience in suspense. Against the backdrop of the strangely, silent streets of postwar Vienna, this follows the search for the third man said to have witnessed the death of Harry Lime as it is undertaken by Rollo Martins, Lime's friend of twenty years, a rather fatuous and adolescent American. And as the inquiry leads from those who know Harry to the girl who loved him, to the folio of a man from Scotland Yard, the climax is reached with the resurrection of the dead man and a stalk through the sewers of the city. The case here, the use of occasional characterization, the unrelieved and undeviating tension demonstrate again a mastery of this medium. (Kirkus Reviews)