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    The Rise and Decline of Nations: Economic Growth, Stagflation and Social Rigidities (Paperback) By (author) Mancur Olson

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    DescriptionThe years since World War II have seen rapid shifts in the relative positions of different countries and regions. Leading political economist Mancur Olson offers a new and compelling theory to explain these shifts in fortune and then tests his theory against evidence from many periods of history and many parts of the world.


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  • Full bibliographic data for The Rise and Decline of Nations

    Title
    The Rise and Decline of Nations
    Subtitle
    Economic Growth, Stagflation and Social Rigidities
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Mancur Olson
    Physical properties
    Format: Paperback
    Number of pages: 288
    Width: 140 mm
    Height: 206 mm
    Thickness: 20 mm
    Weight: 295 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780300030792
    ISBN 10: 0300030797
    Classifications

    B&T Book Type: NF
    BIC E4L: ECO
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: S4.5
    B&T Modifier: Academic Level: 01
    BIC subject category V2: KCB
    LC subject heading:
    LC classification: HD82
    B&T General Subject: 180
    Ingram Subject Code: HP
    Ingram Theme: APPR/RDRCAT
    LC subject heading:
    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 17830
    DC21: 338.9
    LC subject heading:
    B&T Merchandise Category: UP
    LC subject heading:
    B&T Approval Code: A45300000
    DC22: 338.9
    BISAC V2.8: BUS023000
    LC subject heading:
    BISAC V2.8: HIS000000, BUS068000
    LC subject heading:
    DC22: 338.9/001
    LC subject heading:
    LC classification: HD82 .O565 1982
    Thema V1.0: KCB
    Edition
    New edition
    Edition statement
    New edition
    Publisher
    Yale University Press
    Imprint name
    Yale University Press
    Publication date
    10 September 1984
    Publication City/Country
    New Haven
    Review text
    The title may presage an awful lot for one book, but University of Maryland economist Olson is in the business of constructing theories that explain a lot in the simplest way. His Logic of Collective Action (1971) made a big social-science splash by arguing that people can't act for the public good in large groups because the personal sacrifice appears to outweigh the collective benefit, ha this follow-up, he extends his theory to say that those groups that can form for collective action-because they are small enough, and/or are able to employ sanctions to get people to join (e.g., union picketing) - will take time to get going (because of "start-up costs"), and therefore require a stable environment. Since these groups seek to get more for themselves, they are detrimental to the efficiency of the economy as a whole. It follows that the various problems associated with the "ungovernability" of democracies stem from the proliferation of collective-action groups. The English malaise isn't hard to figure out - Britain has the longest history of stability. That doesn't mean that Olson advocates instability to foster economic growth; in fact, his prescriptions are as orthodox as the accepted microeconomic theories (i.e., theories of individual and firm behavior) that are the bedrock of his construct. Rather than revolution, he favors government action to free up trade through reductions in tariffs and protective barriers. In the course of filling out his theory with empirical evidence, Olson drags in everything from Jacksonian America to the Indian caste system. The late-19th-century Japanese leap is seen here to have resulted from the destruction of Japan's internal barriers by the demands of Britain and the Western powers for free trade. But while laissez faire worked to destroy cartelization in Japan, it did not do so in India - where the caste system, unchallenged by governmental authority, prevailed. So Olson is not an unbridled advocate of the dogmas, as he calls them, of the left or the right. His analysis of stagflation is based on the implications of the overall theory - and calls, at the moment, for shorter-term contracts at lower wage rates. Whatever its merits, the theory will have appeal. (Kirkus Reviews)
    Back cover copy
    The years since World War II have seen rapid shifts in the relative positions of different countries and regions. Leading political economist Mancur Olson offers a new and compelling theory to explain these shifts in fortune and then tests his theory against evidence from many periods of history and many parts on the world.